2005 Monmouth County Photographs

An Exhibition

at the

Monmouth County Library Headquarters
125 Symmes Drive
Manalapan, NJ
October 3 to 31, 2005

Prepared by the

Monmouth County Archives

Gary D. Saretzky, Curator
Shane Wilson, Researcher
Chuck Steiner, Photographer
Eugene Osovitz, Preparer

 

This exhibition, organized by the Monmouth County Archives, is drawn from various institutional and private collections, especially the Monmouth County Archives, Monmouth County Historical Association (MCHA), and Dorn’s Photo, the latter two courtesy of Carla Tobias and Laura Poll of MCHA, and Kathy Dorn Severini. Archives summer assistant Shane Wilson did remarkable research in the Archives and other sources and drafted most of the captions for the first 132 of the 163 exhibit items. Eugene Osovitz and Chuck Steiner of the Archives staff did a fine job preparing and mounting the exhibit, the latter also making numerous black-and-white exhibition prints. Randall Gabrielan, Executive Director, Monmouth County Historical Commission, was helpful in providing historical information and a photograph from the Middletown Township Historical Society, for which he serves as President. Portions of this exhibition would not have been possible without the collecting efforts of George H. Moss, Jr., County Historian, who either owns or once owned the originals of a number of the images in the exhibition. County Clerk M. Claire French provided encouragement and support. A grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission helped cover exhibition costs. All of the above contributors have my deepest appreciation.

Gary D. Saretzky
Archivist, County of Monmouth
Monmouth County Archives

Most of these photographs were taken by Paul DeNucci, the official Monmouth County government photographer from about 1973 to 1996. They were transferred to the Monmouth County Archives by DeNucci when he retired from the Monmouth County Public Information and Tourism department.

Paul DeNucci was born in 1925 and began photographing when he was eight years old using glass plate negatives. One of his early photographs was of the burned ocean liner, the Morro Castle, on the beach at Asbury Park. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy as a member of an underwater demolition team and as a photographer. He then worked as a photographer until his retirement in 1996. While working for the County, DeNucci also did free-lance work for the Asbury Park Press or photographed just for his own interests; a few such images are also in the exhibition.

In addition to the DeNucci collection, a few photographs from the Archives’ Red Bank Register Negative Collection are included here. This collection of approximately 1,000 negatives pertaining to Rumson and Sea Bright are from the defunct newspaper’s files and were donated to the Archives by George H. Moss, Jr. Some of them were published in the newspaper.

The photographs’ negative identification numbers are given in brackets. Chuck Steiner of the Archives staff made these prints from the original negatives. Photographs are by DeNucci unless otherwise noted.

1. County Clerk Jane Clayton leafs through Deed Book ABC, January 1983. The book, dating back to 1667, records the first official property transactions ever conducted in Monmouth County. Today it resides in the Monmouth County Archives. [1983-01-04]

2. Deputy County Clerk Nancy Carpenter shows off a then cutting-edge dot-matrix pin-feed printer, March 4, 1983. She served as Deputy County Clerk from 1982 to 1996. [1983-03-01]

3. Three women undertake research in the deed room of the Hall of Records in Freehold, March 4, 1983. Deeds record property transactions and often include information valuable to genealogists and historians. Today the Monmouth County Archives houses thousands of old deeds and deed books (like the ones visible on the shelves in the upper right of the photo) dating back as far as 1669; the County Clerk’s facility at Market Yard in Freehold also has a set. Since 1995, deeds have been recorded via computer and no more deed books are produced. [1983-03-01]

4. Monmouth County Sheriff William Lanzaro poses with a miniature robot in sheriff’s officer’s garb, August 6, 1986. Further details, alas, remain obscure. [1986-08-03]

5. Sheriff William Lanzaro reclines in a dentist’s chair while Freeholder Harry Larrison Jr. awaits his turn, September 14, 1987. This new dental facility was part of a series of renovations and improvements made to the Monmouth County Correctional Institution pursuant to a 1984 federal ruling that declared conditions in the jail unconstitutionally “cruel and unusual.” Thanks to changes like the addition of the dental unit, the inmates’ quality of life went “from medieval…to modern,” as one court official put it. [1987-09-02]

Faistl, Kenneth. Letter to Theodore Freeman Jr., 18 January 1988. From Monmouth County Archives, Freeholders Subject Files microfilm, reel 14, file 253.
Monmouth County Correctional Institution Inmates, et al., v. William Lanzaro, et al. 595 F. Supp. 1417 (1984).

Neff, Bob. “Coercive Fines Studied to Ease Jail Crowding.” Red Bank Register 14 July 1987. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 1, “Correctional Institution.”
6. [Two photographs.] Inmates at the Monmouth County Correctional Institution work in the main kitchen and flex their muscles in the main gymnasium (note the basketball court visible through the weight-room window). At the time of the photo (December 1994) kitchen workers earned $7 a week – a bargain since, as the jail’s director said, “You’d be surprised, a lot of these inmates are really expert [cooks].” The county built the gym to comply with a federal court order mandating improved recreational opportunities; by March 1995, however, the director had eliminated weight training, substituting cardiovascular equipment “to let the inmates ventilate some stress” without bulking up. [1994-12-07]

Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, work session meeting, 16 March 1995: 18-20. Monmouth County Archives.
Pellicane, Guy. Monmouth County Correctional Institution: Highlights of Achievement. Attached to Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders minutes, executive session, 9 March 1995. Monmouth County Archives.
7. See #6.

8. Allentown Police Department joins Monmouth County police radio, October 21, 1987. [1987-10-10]

9. An employee of Monmouth County’s Data Processing Department (now the Department of Information Services) shows off the cutting edge of computer technology circa 1980. Combined, the four reel-to-reel tape drives pictured here offered about 640 megabytes of data storage; a mid-range laptop today might boast 50 times that capacity. [1980-12-07] IBM. “Fifty Years of Storage Innovation: Magnetic Tape and Beyond.

10. Lab technicians test county water at the Monmouth Health Department’s Environmental Laboratory in 1985. Overseen by the state Department of Environmental Protection, the lab monitors drinking water as well as coastal pollution. [1985-07-06] Monmouth County Health Department. “Environmental Laboratory.”

11. At the Monmouth County Central Motor Pool, Freeholder Thomas Powers (right) observes a county-owned Ford Taurus getting tested for emissions levels, October 15, 1987. Created in 1976, the Motor Pool monitors and maintains all county vehicles, from trucks to lawnmowers, and even operates a county gas station in Freehold. [1987-10-07] “Central Motor Pool.”

12. Zaorski, William J. “County Budget Holds Tax Line.” Red Bank Register 3 March 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, reel 6, “Motor Pool.”
12. A broken chair awaits repair by the county’s Department of Buildings and Grounds, January 13, 1981. [1981-01-04]

13. Monmouth County Health Officer Lester Jargowsky uses a Geiger counter to test jewelry for radioactivity, February 2, 1983. The ceramic baubles, made in the cheap but ornately adorned cloisonné style, came under suspicion after the New York Health Department learned that similar pieces, imported from Taiwan, emitted unhealthy levels of radiation due to the presence of uranium salts in their paint. This discovery came by accident: the Health Department stumbled across “hot” cloisonné items while looking for radioactive gold jewelry, which had previously been found to cause skin irritation and in a few cases even cancer, sometimes necessitating finger amputation. Fortunately, Monmouth’s search turned up few such dangerous items. [1983-02-03] “Caution: Radioactive Jewelry.” New York Times 26 January 1983: B4.
Newman, Arlene. “Free Tests Set Up for ‘Hot’ Gifts.” Asbury Park Press 3 February 1983: A1.
Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Health Physics Historical Instrumentation Collection. “Poster Issued by New York Department of Health (ca. 1981).”
“Suspect Jewelry Is ‘Hot.’” Asbury Park Press 2 February 1983: C1.

14. “Jim’s House” in Allenwood [possibly the Geraldine Thompson Medical Home], August 1982. [1982-08-07]

15. Four young men enjoy carpentry lessons on the beach thanks to the federal Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA), a now defunct source of funds for state and local governments to spend on helping the disadvantaged and the unemployed build skills and find jobs. CETA was replaced by the Job Training Partnership Act, which continues to provide similar benefits through the Employment and Training Division of the county’s Human Services department. [1980-06-02] “Comprehensive Employment Training Act.” The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. New York: Columbia UP, 2001-4. <http://www.bartleby.com/65/e-/E-Comprehen.html>.
“County Agencies.”

16. A Class B North wrestling match between Rumson–Fair Haven and Monmouth Regional High Schools comes to a close as the referee looks on, February 4, 1981. The identities of the pictured wrestlers are unknown, but the pinned student probably hailed from Rumson – the school lost to Monmouth, 25-36.
[Photographer unknown / Red Bank Register Photo Collection at the Monmouth County Archives, 1981-02-01 RBR] “Branchers Clinch Crown.” Asbury Park Press, 5 February 1981: C5.

17. Five members of the Jersey Ski-Ters water-ski club smile for the camera as two young fans in colonial-era garb look on, May 22, 1976, in Red Bank. The club was founded in 1953 to foster interest in waterskiing and to host competitions; it became one of the oldest and most active such organizations in America. (The colonial attire in the photo is not as unusual as it may seem – since 1976 was the U.S. Bicentennial, nostalgic fashions were quite popular for a time, especially on special occasions.) [1976-05-20] “Area Water Skiing Club Will Celebrate 25th Year.” Red Bank Register 30 June 1977. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, not yet microfilmed, “Jersey Ski-Ters.”

18. Employees of the Monmouth County Board of Social Services perform a scene from a play dealing with the now defunct Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) welfare program, June 20, 1980. The play, entitled “A Day Late,” was staged for civic and service groups throughout the county; it was developed in collaboration with the Monmouth Family Center by economically disadvantaged county residents hired under the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA). [1980-06-09] “Play Dramatizes Program.” Red Bank Register 10 April 1980. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 7, “Social Services Board.”

19. Office on Aging annual party committee (?) in Western attire, March 14, 1988. [1988-03-08]

20. In 1981, six-year-old Erin O’Shea and Sister Carmelisa, former principal of Rumson’s Holy Cross School, look forward to Catholic Schools Week, an annual celebration held the first week of February by the Trenton Diocese.
[Photo by Carl Forino / Red Bank Register Photo Collection at the Monmouth County Archive, 1981-01-04 RBR] “Students in County to Participate in Catholic Schools Week Events.” Red Bank Register 30 January 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 23, “Catholic Schools Week.”

21. Monmouth County sheriff’s officers present themselves for inspection, April 30, 1987. [1987-04-12]

22. Sheriff William Lanzaro (third from right in sports jacket) inspects the corrections officers at the Monmouth County Correctional Institution in Freehold, June 4, 1987. [1987-06-02]

23. Two would-be police officers hone their pistol skills at the Monmouth County Police Academy’s shooting range, October 8, 1986. At the time of the photo the facility was brand-new; its shooting range, offering training for recruits and practice for veterans, was just one of the amenities afforded by the state-of-the-art, 38,400-square-foot facility on Kozloski Road in Freehold. [1986-10-05] McCarthy, Stephen. “County Police Academy Opens.” Red Bank Register 15 May 1986. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, not yet microfilmed, “Monmouth County: Police Academy.”

24. Who are these two men, and why are they examining a hole in the door’s window? This undated (c. 1975?) photo remains a mystery. [00-00-52]

25. Two stern-looking members of the Rumson police force – Ptl. David Gaynor, left, and Ptl. William Patton – warn of the dangers of illicit fireworks, February 1981.
[Photographer unknown / Red Bank Register Photo Collection at the Monmouth County Archives, 1981-02-04 RBR]

26. Two recruits at the Monmouth County Police Academy get a lesson in self-defense and baton technique on October 3, 1982. [1982-10-01]

27. An impressive crowd fills the street of Belmar for the annual eight-mile WalkAmerica, a fundraiser for the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, April 24, 1994. Some 3,500 people participated in the walk, raising $193,000 in support of infant health. With a 250-person delegation, Monmouth County employees made up the largest group of walkers, led by Freeholder Theodore Narozanick. [1994-04-04] Bakst, Diane. “Healthy Baby Steps: Walk in Belmar Raises $193,000 for March of Dimes.” Asbury Park Press 25 April 1994: C1.

28. The Kozloski family poses for a group photo at the dedication ceremony for Kozloski Road in Freehold, June 2, 1980. Built with the intention of relieving congestion on Routes 9 and 33, the road was named after State Assemblyman Walter J. Kozloski (1935 – 1979), a former Freehold Borough Council member and Howell Twp. teacher who died in office while completing his third two-year term. Pictured clockwise from upper left are an unidentified man; Kozloski’s son Walter; his wife Louise; and his three daughters, Lea, Laura, and Lorraine. [1980-06-03] Geary, Robert J. “Kozloski Loses Fight with Kidney Failure.” Asbury Park Press 26 November 1979: A1.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Resolution 80-170, in minutes, regular public meeting, 6 March 1980: 52-3. Monmouth County Archives.

29. Jessie Craig (center) celebrates her 106th birthday at the county-run John L. Montgomery Medical Home as Director of Nursing Catherine Fountain (right) and an unidentified attendant look on, July 1, 1977. Craig was one of the original residents of the nursing home when it opened in 1931; 46 years later she was its oldest. Notwithstanding the cake and candles, Craig actually did not know the exact date of her birth – July 1st was simply her caretakers’ best guess. [1977-07-03] “Centennial Plus One.” Red Bank Register 2 August 1972. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, not yet microfilmed, “Nursing Homes: John L. Montgomery.”
“Happy Birthday!” Asbury Park Press 2 July 1977: C2.

30. An unidentified Marlboro resident puts his zinnias on display, October 1978. [1978-10-15]

31. Local volunteer firefighters hone their ladder skills at the county’s former Fire and Police Academy, now simply the Fire Academy, on Route 33 in Howell, November 13, 1976. Other topics for instruction included chemistry, hose-laying, and forcible entry. [1976-11-10] “57 Take Fire School Course.” Red Bank Register 30 November 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 2, “Fire and Police Academy.”

32. A local firefighter demonstrates the proper technique for battling electrical blazes using a substation simulator donated to the county Fire Academy by Jersey Central Power & Light, June 25, 1982. Today the Fire Academy’s training facilities for electrical firefighting are among the best in the nation; officials from other counties and states flock to Monmouth to hone their skills. [1982-06-02] Leggett, Frederick, fire marshal. Report to the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, December 1982: 2. In Freeholder Meetings: Clerk of the Board records, Monmouth County Archives.
Smith, Timothy. Telephone interview, 4 August 2005.

33. Red Bank volunteer firefighters battle a devastating blaze at Nadler’s Discount Furniture Store on February 10, 1976. It took 250 men and 16 fire trucks to contain the flames – an especially urgent task since the neighboring shop pictured here, Anthony’s Cleaners and Tailors, contained a large supply of the highly flammable solvent naphtha. The fire completely destroyed Nadler’s store, which had just previously held a going-out-of-business sale; today the 27 Monmouth Street location is occupied by Bella Soul, an upscale lingerie store. [1976-02-12] McDonnell, Julie. “Fire Destroys Nadler’s Store in Red Bank.” Red Bank Register 11 February 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 35, “Fires.”
Red Bank RiverCenter Business Directory: <http://www.redbankrivercenter
.org/directory.cfm>
Stravelli, Gloria. “Many Changes Will Greet R.B. Holiday Shoppers.” The Hub 4 October 2002: <http://hub.gmnews.com/news/2002/1004/Front_page/
066.html>.

34. Local firefighters hose down the historic Avon Inn in Avon-by-the-Sea after a raging conflagration reduced the 1883 structure to ruins. Fortunately, the July 20, 1978, fire resulted in no major injuries – the hotel was empty, having been closed for winter the previous year and never reopened. It had come a long way from its glory days at the turn of the century, when the likes of Jay Gould and John D. Rockefeller enjoyed its lavish appointments; indeed, the Avon Inn was once so prominent that the borough of Avon is thought to be named after the inn, not the other way around. [1978-07-04] Ricmey, Warren. “Fire Ruins Avon Inn.” Red Bank Register 20 July 1978. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 18, “Avon: Fire.”
Vespucci, Rich, and Larry Waddell. “Aged Inn Wrecked by Early Morning Fire.” Asbury Park Press 20 July 1978: A1.

35. [4 photographs.] The American Revolution rages on as reenactors bring to life the famous Battle of Monmouth while an audience of 70,000 enjoys the spectacle. This June, 25, 1978, reenactment was special for two reasons. First, it marked the battle’s bicentennial, albeit three days early. Second, the role of “Molly Pitcher” went to 17-year-old Elizabeth Hays from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the great-great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter of Mary Hays McCauley, the woman some historians believe inspired the Pitcher legend. [1978-06-01] Bacon, Barbara. “70,000 View ‘Battle of Monmouth.’” Asbury Park Press 26 June 1978: A1.

36. See #35.

37. See #35.

38. See #35.

39. Admiring the new Molly Pitcher commemorative ten-cent postal card on its first day of issue are (from left to right) Edward Horgan, executive assistant to the U.S. postmaster general; George Goodfellow, chairman of the Monmouth County Heritage Committee; and Samuel Smith, historian for the committee. It took eighteen months of lobbying to bring into being and marked a retreat from the original goal of creating a Molly stamp, but the card was a hit with collectors and came out in time for the Battle of Monmouth bicentennial in 1978. [1978-09-10]. “Park Memorial to Honor Molly Pitcher.” Asbury Park Press 9 September 1978: B7.

40. The Battle of Monmouth Monument stands tall in Freehold on a clear day in September 1973. Located in a small triangular park bounded by Court and Monmouth Streets, the monument was built in 1884 to honor those who died in the crucial Revolutionary War battle. The statue that perches atop the granite monolith is actually an 1896 duplicate of the original work, Liberty Triumphant, which was severely damaged by lightning. Somehow the original was lost but eventually ended up in the backyard of a Jackson man, who sold it back to the county to be restored and installed in a new park next to the Hall of Records in Freehold. [1973-09-05] Conohan, Sherry. “Long-Lost Bust Will Return to Freehold.” Asbury Park Press 8 January 2000: B1.
Jordan, Bob. “Sculpture and Scrimmage Mark 225th Anniversary of Revolution’s Battle of Monmouth.” Asbury Park Press 27 June 2003: B1.
Reynolds-Peck, Jane. “The Battle of Monmouth Monument.” Monmouth County Historical Association: <http://www.monmouth.com/~mcha3/
monument.html>.

41. Two well-behaved lions await instruction from their off-camera tamer, Captain Dave Hoover, at a Clyde Beatty–Cole Bros. Circus show in Eatontown, c. 1972. [00-00-25] Efthyvoulou, Lonia. “Big Circus in Eatontown Thrills Many Youngsters.” Red Bank Register 1 June 1971. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 25, “Circus.”

42. A massive tuna impresses three men, perhaps in Belmar, February 1973. [1987-04-12]

43. Freeholder Thomas Lynch Jr. (left) and Traffic Engineer Richard Sweet preside over the installation of new guardrails on Route 537 near the boundary between Colts Neck and Tinton Falls, July 16, 1980. [1980-07-12]

44. Insignificant as it may appear, this overgrown portion of Pemberton Creek in Oceanport (as seen from the edge of an unfinished bridge along Oceanport Avenue in September 1978) lay at the center of a five-year-long battle between the county, the Borough of Oceanport, and the U.S. Coast Guard. In the name of urban renewal, the borough and county had sought to rebuild Oceanport Avenue – but the Coast Guard asserted jurisdiction over Pemberton Creek as a “navigable waterway” rich with environmental resources, to which the bridge project posed a danger. All parties threatened legal action, and some Oceanport citizens even proposed paving over the bridge themselves as an act of bicentennial rebellion. By 1979, however, cooler heads had prevailed and the bridge was finished with minimal environmental impact. [1978-09-03] Conohan, Sherry. “Coast Guard Order Halts Work on Oceanport Bridge.” Red Bank Register 11 June 1975. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register microfilm, reel 26, “Coast Guard.”
Ellis, Linda. “Irate Oceanport Group May Take July 4 Action at Delayed Bridge.” Red Bank Register 6 February 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register microfilm, reel 26, “Coast Guard.”
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Resolution 78-577, from minutes, regular public meeting, 5 December 1978: 25-6.

45. [Two photographs.] Turner Street and a wooded path adjoining Heritage Road, both in Eatontown, look pleasant and sedate in these July 1975 photos, all leafy trees and gentle shadows. But the tranquility belies the location: directly across Wyckoff Road from the Monmouth Mall. Indeed, at the time these photos were taken, the county was preparing to widen Wyckoff Road to accommodate an expansion of the mall; the photos were probably part of the preparation. Understandably, this project raised the ire of homeowners in places like Turner Street who insisted that the “widening take place on the property belonging to the Monmouth Shopping Center and not impinge on their front yards.” In the end, though, widening won out. [1975-07-01] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, recessed meeting, 1 October 1974: 6-8; regular meeting, 4 March 1975: 18-9. Monmouth County Archives.

46. See #45.

47. Freeholder Frank Self (left) and State Senator John Gallagher examine erosion damage to the north-approach seawall of the Oceanic Bridge linking Rumson and Middletown, June 30, 1983. Repairing the protective barrier cost $346,217, eighty percent of which was borne by the state and the rest by the county. Such collaboration also characterized the original 1939 construction of the bridge, a joint venture of the county and the Depression-era Public Works Administration. Today the bridge is considered “one of the most architectonically and technologically distinguished” of its kind. [1983-06-04] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Resolution 83-368, in minutes, regular public meeting, 25 August 1983: 18-9; work session meeting, 12 January 1984: 8-9. Monmouth County Archives.
New Jersey Department of Transportation, Bureau of Environmental Analysis and the Federal Highway Administration, New Jersey Division. The New Jersey Historic Bridge Survey. Monmouth County survey: 44-5.

48. The Shark River Bridge joining Belmar and Avon-by-the-Sea opens over the Big Marie S in this 1977 photo. The oak-frame party boat, built in Atlantic City in 1965, belonged to Hank Koch, now a Monmouth County Archives employee, who used it to take customers on half-day fishing trips in the Atlantic Ocean. [1977-00-34] Koch, Hank. Oral interview, 10 August 2005.

49. Keansburg Beach’s dunes slope off into the Raritan Bay, July 1984; at right looms the Ferris wheel of the Keansburg Amusement Park, established as a resort area in 1904 when the beach was cobbled together with imported sand. [1984-07-04] Riley, Michael. “Keansburg Amusement Park Offers Family Fun, Nostalgia.” Asbury Park Press 13 August 2005: < http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/
article?AID=/20050813/LIFE/50813005/1006 >.

50. An automotive accident in 1977 brings a dented (1963?) Ford Galaxie 500 to the doorstep of Temple Beth Miriam in the Elberon section of Long Branch. [1977-00-42]

51. Freeholder Frank Self (left), Highway Supervisor Harry Rash (right), and another County Highway Department official inspect a new 1983 Dodge Aries to be purchased for department use, July 13, 1983. The vehicle, part of Chrysler’s “K” family of station wagons, cost Monmouth taxpayers $9,097. [1983-07-06] Gold, Aaron, and Stephen Lyons. “All Hail the Mighty K-Car!” <http://www.allpar.com/eek/k/k.html>.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, regular public meeting, 14 July 1983: 39-42.

52. Officials from the county Shade Tree Commission and members of the Squankum Fire Company survey the wreckage of a crashed Hiller 12E helicopter, July 17, 1980. Pilot William Gaughan, Jr., narrowly avoided striking the utility poles visible in the background of the photo when the helicopter’s engine lost power during a diagnostic test run; he eked out an emergency landing on the Cruz Farm Golf Course near the sixth hole. The Shade Tree Commission had been using the chopper as part of its gypsy moth control program. [1980-07-05] Devlin, Jacquelin C. “Helicopter Crashes during Test; Pilot Walks Away without Injury.” Asbury Park Press 18 June 1980.

53. The Monmouth Hall of Records’ clock reads ten a.m. as two men chat on the way into this historic building. Constructed in 1874, the Hall was the fourth county courthouse to occupy the same plot of land in Freehold (the second such courthouse famously served as a hospital during the Battle of Monmouth). In 1955, however, most court functions were transferred to a new structure elsewhere, giving a new mission to what became the Hall of Records: storing documents for the County Clerk. Today the Hall plays host to the Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Surrogate’s Office, and other county departments. Strangely, it still houses a single courtroom – if it did not, the land would revert to the descendants of the original owner, John Reid, under the terms of a 1714 deed. [1973-09-07] Monmouth Bar Assocation. The Advocate: Official Publication of the Monmouth Bar Association – Courthouse Dedication Edition. 8 October 1955.
Monmouth County Department of Public Information. “History of the Hall of Records.” <http://www.visitmonmouth.com/publicinformation/
history.htm>.

54. [2 photographs.] The Hall of Records gets a much needed makeover as its rear exterior walls are refurbished, August 12, 1982. Garden State Brickface & Stucco Co. took on the project in exchange for a lump-sum payment of $58,300. On the date of the photo the county’s Board of Chosen Freeholders got a chance to see the taxpayers’ money in action – they conducted a public meeting on the Hall’s second floor, authorizing the purchase of a landfill compactor and urging the completion of Route 18, among other agenda items. [1982-08-02]

55. See #54.

56. A year and a half after closing down for business, the Steinbach Building on Cookman Avenue in Asbury Park, once home to the swanky department store that anchored Asbury’s retail economy, sits abandoned and boarded up, December 1980. Note the fifth floor, a late addition to the original 1897 construction; it would be destroyed by arson in 1989. After languishing in limbo for years, the Steinbach Building is currently undergoing restoration and conversion into housing and commercial space. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [1980-12-02] Pike, Helen-Chantal. Asbury Park’s Glory Days. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005. 142-3, 168.
Shields, Nancy. “A Lofty Plan for Rebirth.” Asbury Park Press 3 September 2005: A1.
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Historic Preservation Office. New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places. Monmouth County: 1. <http://www.state.nj.us/dep/hpo/1identify/lists/monmouth.pdf>.

57. A lone worker prepares to put some finishing touches on a newly constructed Highway Department garage in Hazlet, February 1, 1983. A twin facility was built in Tinton Falls; together, the two projects cost the county $238,502. [1983-02-02] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, work session meeting, 6 May 1982: 2; resolution 82-244, in minutes, regular public meeting, 13 May 1982: 25-6; minutes, regular public meeting, 22 July 1982: 66; resolution 82-500, in minutes, regular public meeting, 14 October 1982: 58-60.

58. The entrance to a Conover Street, Freehold, home shows signs of decay and distress – note the four locks on the door. This August 7, 1985, photo was taken before the Monmouth County Board of Social Services refurbished the home with the financial assistance of a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development program aimed at supporting decent, affordable living space in low-income areas. [1985-08-04] Riker, Diane. “County Breathes New Life into Old Frame.” Red Bank Register 14 August 1985. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 7, “Social Services Board.”

59. The harvest looms large at the Flock Brothers Potato Farm, December 1974. William and Richard Flock spent 50 years tending their 376 acres of Colts Neck soil until a rezoning ordinance led them to liquidate their property and abandon their potatoes in 1987. [1974-12-04] Johnson, Mary Gay. “Flock Farm Auction Marks End of an Era.” Red Bank Register 16 January 1987. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 35, “Flock Farm.”

60. Freedman’s Bakery in Freehold displays a “Help Wanted” sign and urges, “Take Freedman’s on All Your Summer Outings,” June 4, 1986. Founded in 1950 by David Freedman and his son Herbert, the bakery today operates over 20 branches throughout Monmouth and Ocean Counties, cranking out 400 cakes a day at its Belmar headquarters alone. [1986-06-03] Diamond, Michael. “Freedman’s Bakery Closes Four Stores.” Asbury Park Press 23 February 2000: B9.
Sapia, Joseph. “Finishing Cakes the Write Way.” Asbury Park Press 20 July 2000: A Day in the Life of Belmar and South Belmar, 1.

61. The Court Street School in Freehold stands as a monument to both the now outdated “separate but equal” doctrine of the 1890s and changing social norms. Opened in 1921 as a segregated facility for black children, the school spanned kindergarten through eighth grade, originally within the confines of two classrooms. While some of the students resented being sent to a black-only school, they all enjoyed the attention of dedicated teachers determined to make the best out of the situation. After Freehold schools were integrated in 1949, Court Street continued to operate until 1971. As this February 1983 photo shows – note the graffiti underneath the rightmost window and the shingles missing from the roof – the school fell into disrepair. It was later restored by local groups and rechristened in 1997 as the Court Street School Education Community Center. Serving as a museum as well as a hub for tutoring and other service programs, the school is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [1983-02-04] Celano, Clare Marie. “Court Street School Event to Support New Programs.” News Transcript 17 April 2002: <http://newstranscript.gmnews.com/News/
2002/0417/Front_Page/008.html>.
Paul, Connie. Interview with Nicy Ham Russell and Lillie Ham Hendry. 28 August 2000. Remembering the 20th Century: An Oral History of Monmouth County. <http://www.visitmonmouth.com/oralhistory/bios/LivingstoneJohn.htm>.

62. Philip Gumbs swears in as Freeholder on a Bible held by his son, January 2, 1974. Gumbs became the county’s first black Chosen Freeholder as well as Aberdeen’s first black mayor, holding both posts simultaneously until 1976, when he was appointed a state compensation judge by Governor Brendan Byrne. After a 25-year judicial career, Gumbs retired in 2001. [1974-01-01] Conohan, Sherry. “Gumbs to Quit County Post to Become Judge.” Red Bank Register 6 February 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1976.”
Point-du-Jour, Rodney. “Retiring Judge’s Career a Long Series of Firsts.” Asbury Park Press 28 December 2001: B1.

63. Inaugurating his twenty-second year as a county freeholder, Harry Larrison Jr. utters his oath of office while placing his left hand on a Bible held by his grandson, January 5, 1988. Breaking the state record for longest-running career in county government, Larrison retired at the end of 2004. In his farewell address at a meeting of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, he took particular pride for his role in reserving large quantities of land for parks and golf courses as Monmouth County’s development grew rapidly during his tenure. But his reputation was marred in April 2005 when an FBI investigation led to charges that he accepted bribes. Before he had a chance to respond to these accusations in court, Larrison passed away on May 29, 2005. [1988-01-02] Matheson, Kathy, and Nina Rizzo. “Admirers Point to Larrison’s Key Role in County’s Growth.” Asbury Park Press 31 May 2005: A1.
Matheson, Kathy, Nina Rizzo, and James Quirk. “Larrison Charged with Taking Bribes.” Asbury Park Press 28 April 2005: A1.
Rizzo, Nina. “Family, Business Shaped Larrison’s Politics.” Asbury Park Press 28 April 2005: A8.

64. Lawrence Lawson (left) proudly formalizes his appointment to the Superior Court as County Clerk Jane Clayton and Superior Court Judge Alvin Yale Milberg look on, January 16, 1987. Lawson’s career in government has been a long series of firsts: He was Monmouth’s first black law clerk and Superior Court judge, as well as Neptune’s first black mayor. Noting that his swearing-in ceremony came just a day after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, Lawson remarked, “His dream allowed my dream to come true.” [1987-01-01] Sunay, Robert. “Judgeship Culminates Career Goal.” Asbury Park Press 17 January 1987: A5.

65. County officials and engineering consultants brandish a ceremonial ribbon to mark the completion of a new at-grade railroad crossing on Shrewsbury Avenue in Shrewsbury, July 22, 1993. Building the crossing took the county 13 years and $1.4 million as it battled red tape in Trenton and safety and business concerns in Monmouth. At times, tempers flared: when the mayor of Shrewsbury Borough threatened “to lay himself across the road” to halt construction work, Freeholder Carmen Stoppiello responded, “Blast him! . . . Do they want people to die?” [1993-07-04] Feridh, Stephanie A. “Shrewsbury Wary of Proposal to Eliminate Railroad Bridge.” Red Bank Register 11 July 1986. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, reel 22, “Bridge: Over Railroad.”
Katell, Barbara. “Bridge May Be Leveled.” Red Bank Register 19 September 1980. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, reel 22, “Bridge: Over Railroad.”
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, work session meeting, 21 March 1991: 16-7.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Resolution 92-645, in minutes, regular public meeting, 23 July 1992: 109-10.

66. Manasquan Reservoir in Howell, October 1987 – from left to right, Governor Thomas Kean, Director of the Board of Chosen Freeholders Harry Larrison, Jr., Assemblyman Joseph Palaia, and State Senator Frank Pallone, Jr. The reservoir went into public use in 1990, providing up to 30 million gallons of water per day to Monmouth municipalities and utility companies. It also offers a picturesque five-mile trail for runners, bikers, and equestrians, along with an educational Environmental Center and 740 acres of open water for anglers. [1987-10-14] Monmouth County Park System. “Manasquan Reservoir.” <http://www.monmouthcountyparks.com/parks/manasquan_park.asp>.
New Jersey Water Supply Authority. “Manasquan Reservoir.” <http://www.njwsa.org/Manasquan.htm>.
“Reservoir of Activity: There’s Plenty to Do at Manasquan.” Asbury Park Press 27 September 2001: C10.

67. Three Monmouth County freeholders and their Ocean County counterparts celebrate Monmouth’s 300th “birthday” in Toms River, April 6, 1983 – somewhat belatedly, since the county was technically founded in March 1683, not April. Ray Kramer (second from left), Thomas Powers, and Frank Self (holding knife on right) brought the cake and saltwater taffy, while H. George Buckwald (holding knife on left), the director of the Ocean County board, spearheaded a resolution congratulating Monmouth on its three centuries of history, of which Ocean County was part until it separated in 1850. [1983-04-06] Ellis, Franklin. History of Monmouth County, New Jersey. Cottonport, LA: Polyanthos, 1992. 101-3.
“Ocean Helps Monmouth’s Celebration.” Asbury Park Press 7 April 1983: B1.

68. Freeholders Harry Larrison (left) and Ernest Kavalek are all smiles as they review the results of the 1976 general election with new Freeholder-elect Jane Clayton, the first woman voted into the county’s governing body. Clayton only won by a narrow margin of 3,999 votes, but it was enough for the Republicans to regain the majority. After the expiration of her term, Clayton served as County Clerk from 1980 to 1996. [1976-11-03] “Mrs. Clayton’s Victory Edge Was, Officially, 3,999 Votes.” Red Bank Register 10 November 1976. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1976.”

69. Monmouth County Freeholder Harry Larrison Jr. (second from left) dedicates the Pine Brook Golf Course, a par-61, executive-length facility, to residents of the Covered Bridge Adult Community of Manalapan, July 11, 1981. Located on Route 9 South, Pine Brook is still in use today for many amateur golf tournaments and recreational play. [1981-07-10] [Caption by Archives summer intern Joseph Lucarelli] “County Will Receive Golf Links Tomorrow.” Red Bank Register 12 July 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1981”

70. Firefighters from Rumson’s Oceanic Hook and Ladder Co. – Chief Robert Shay, Capt. Ken Friscia, Lt. Charles Hendrickson, and Edward Duffy – surround Freeholder Jane Clayton on May 24, 1979, to receive a certificate of recognition from the county commemorating the 100th anniversary of the fire company. As Clayton herself pointed out, she was in a unique position to present the certificate – her husband was once Rumson’s fire chief. [1979-06-04] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, regular public meeting, 24 May 1979: 1-4. Monmouth County Archives.

71. Former County Clerk John Fiorino beams as Marianne and Melissa Manza, three-year-old twins from South Korea adopted by a Wayside family, enjoy their naturalization ceremony and become U.S. citizens, June 4, 1979. Monmouth County clerks performed naturalizations until Clerk Jane Clayton ceased the procedure in 1991. [1979-04-04] “96 New Americans Take Oath of Allegiance.” Red Bank Register 5 June 1979. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings, not yet microfilmed, “Naturalized Citizens.”

72. Little Jill MacAllister, a three-year-old born in Bogotá, Colombia, ponders her new American citizenship as Superior Court Judge Louis Aikins administers a loyalty oath and Jill’s parents, John and Carolyn MacAllister of Bradley Beach, look on, March 7, 1977. [1977-03-02] “Tot Given Oath Says, ‘Now I’m an American.’” Asbury Park Press 8 March 1977: C3

.
73. Philip Gumbs (right) welcomes his new colleagues and fellow Democrats Ray Kramer (left) and Thomas Lynch Jr. to the Board of Chosen Freeholders, January 2, 1974. Kramer and Lynch would each serve nine years on the Board, including stints as director and deputy director for both. [1975-01-01]

74. Four Monmouth County sheriff’s officers show off their new uniforms, November 1, 1982; Sheriff William Lanzaro, right, looks jealous. [1982-11-03]

75. John P. Montedoro is escorted off a Department of Corrections bus to hear the verdict in his second trial for the 1974 murder of Bradley Beach teenager Daniel Hernandez and his 10-year-old nephew Julio. Furious over his girl friend’s romantic involvement with Hernandez, Montedoro lured him and his nephew into a wooded area in Tinton Falls and shot them both. He quickly confessed but seemed delusional and confused; his defense attorney argued that he was a paranoid schizophrenic and deserved a verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity. Initially Montedoro was convicted, but on appeal he won a new trial. This time he had better luck with his defense, and on September 21, 1976, he was found not guilty; due to his illness, however, was committed to a state mental hospital. [1976-09-06] “Montedoro Sent to Mental Hospital.” Asbury Park Press 22 September 1976: B12.

76. Five judges confer during a judicial ceremony in the Monmouth County Courthouse jury assemblyroom, February 27, 1976. Superior Court Judge Merritt Lane Jr., left, and state Supreme Court Justice Mark Sullivan, right, were overseeing the “elevation” of County Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Judge Burton Fundler (second left) to the County Court and County Court Judges Marshall Selikoff and John Arnone to the Superior Court. These elevations had been the subject of a heated dispute between then-Governor Brendan Byrne and two Monmouth County state senators, both of whom invoked the tradition of “senatorial courtesy” by which senators can unilaterally block proposed gubernatorial appointees who hail from their own district. But when Byrne denounced the tradition as “repugnant to democratic government” and threatened to elevate judges from outside Monmouth, the intransigent senators reached a compromise. [1976-02-10] “Byrne to Resubmit Names of Same Judgeship Choices.” Red Bank Register 14 January 1976.
Conohan, Sherry. “Byrne Names 2 for Judgeships.” Red Bank Register 4 February 1976.
Conohan, Sherry. “4 County Judgeship Nominees Confirmed.” Red Bank Register 20 February 1976.
Zaorski, William J. “Three Judges Elevated.” Red Bank Register 1 March 1976.
(All from Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 2, “Court.”)

77. County Historian George Moss Jr. and County Clerk Jane Clayton seem pleased with an old court document stored at the Monmouth County Archives on the eve of its opening to the public in August 1994. Home to hundreds of thousands of county records from as far back as the seventeenth century, the Archives was built in 1987 in response to public outrage over the appalling storage conditions of many historic local documents, some of which were kept in a squirrel-infested warehouse, where they were used as fuel for vagrants’ fires. Between 1987 and 1994, only a few scholars used the archives by appointment; today it serves hundreds of patrons every year. [1994-08-02] Katell, Barbara. “County Losing Its Old Records to Damp Neglect.” Red Bank Register 7 September 1979. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1979.”
Sapia, Joseph. “Opening the Books.” Asbury Park Press 17 August 1994: C1.
Saretzky, Gary D. Oral interview, 12 August 2005.

78. Carrying out a dedication ceremony for the new Monmouth County Library Headquarters in Manalapan are (left to right) Renee Swartz, chairwoman of the Library Commissioners; John Livingstone, Library Director; and Freeholder Harry Larrison, Jr. The Manalapan library was intended to be for western Monmouth what the Shrewsbury library was for eastern Monmouth: a cultural hub for the whole community. Today it circulates more than a million books and media items per year, a statewide record. [1987-04-07] Fontaine, Hildy Wils. “The Secret Is Now Out – Out West, That Is.” Red Bank Register 28 April 1987. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”
Rifkin, Jonathan. “Check This Out!: Monmouth County Library Loans 1 Millionth Item.” Asbury Park Press 3 January 2002: Marlboro-Manalapan Reporter, 1.

79. Renee Swartz, chairperson of the Monmouth County Library Commission, hands now former County Library Director John Livingstone a silver bowl commemorating his election to the presidency of the New Jersey Library Association in 1977. Livingstone sought to use that post to promote statewide Monmouth County’s model of library as “community cultural center” – a model he had helped create by founding Jazz Week. Library director from 1969 to 1991, Livingstone went on to become the State Librarian until his retirement in 2001. [1977-00-25] “Livingstone State Unit Head.” Red Bank Register 9 May 1977. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”
Newman, Rhoad. Interview with John Livingstone, March 13, 2000. Remembering the 20th Century: An Oral History of Monmouth County. <http://www.visitmonmouth.com/oralhistory/bios/LivingstoneJohn.htm>.

80. Renowned jazz pianist Marian McPartland looks demure during a performance at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library in Shrewsbury, November 23, 1975. McPartland, host of the long-running National Public Radio program, “Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz,” entertained an audience of 800 as part of the Library’s third annual Jazz Week. [1975-11-02] Jacobson, Carol. “Library Jazz Fete Success Exceeds All Expectations.” Red Bank Register 24 February 1975. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1975.”
National Public Radio. “Meet Marian McPartland.” <http://www.npr.org/
programs/pianojazz/meetmarian.html>.

81. Two disabled residents of Monmouth County – Charles Vreeland (left) and Alex Buono, acting director of the county’s Office of the Handicapped – try out a new ramp installed at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library in Shrewsbury, August 20, 1979. There to insure a smooth maiden voyage are Library Director John Livingstone (left) and Freeholder Allan MacDonald. [1979-08-14] “Ride the Ramp.” Red Bank Register 21 August 1979. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”

82. Freeholder Allan MacDonald, who served on the county board from 1979 to 1981, lends an arm to the Central Jersey Blood Center, March 14, 1979. [1979-03-04]

83. Government officials and community leaders reach out to touch a few of the 500 dolls clothed and personalized as holiday gifts for underprivileged children in a joint venture of the Monmouth County Board of Social Services and the New Jersey Division of the Salvation Army, December 15, 1981. Posing from left to right are Major Carl Schoch of the Salvation Army, Board of Social Services Director Louis Armour, Alfred Swenarton of the Salvation Army, and Freeholder and Assemblyman-Elect Joseph Palaia. [1981-12-01] “Party for Dolls.” Red Bank Register 30 December 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 7, “Social Services Board.”

84. A life-long public servant and Monmouth resident, Theodore J. Narozanick is currently serving his seventh three-year term on the Board of Chosen Freeholders. At the time of this November 1973 photo, however, he was working as the county’s budget director; within months he would be appointed the first county administrator, paving the way to his successful run for freeholder in 1986. [1973-11-08] McCarthy, Stephen. “Old Hand in Government Moves into New Role.” Red Bank Register 7 January 1986. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 2, “Freeholders: 1986.”
Monmouth County Department of Public Information. “Freeholder Theodore J. Narozanick.” <http://www.visitmonmouth.com/publicinformation/
narozanick_-_bio.htm>.
“Narozanick Sworn in as County Administrator.” Red Bank Register 6 March 1974. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 1, “Administrator.”

85. County Finance Director Mark Acker smiles for the camera, August 1984. As the head of the Department of Finance, a post he has held since the time of the photo, he oversees the county’s budget and manages its debt. [1984-08-08]

86. The Rumson Borough Council gets down to business on January 1, 1981, the first day of a new term. This all-Republican group included the municipality’s first female council member. Pictured left to right: William H. Hyatt, George H. Moss, Jr., Harry Barbee, Jr., Mayor Charles F. Paterno, Carolyn Callen, and Charles S. Callman.
[Photo by Don Lordi / Red Bank Register Photo Collection at the Monmouth County Archives, 1981-01-01 RBR] “All-Republican Rumson Council Finishes Facelift.” Red Bank Register 2 January 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 12, “Rumson Council.”

87. At the old Seaview Square mall in Ocean Township, freeholders’ faces greet visitors to a “Meet Your County” display organized by the Department of Public Information and Tourism, September 15, 1982. At left is the visage of Freeholder Harry Larrison, Jr.; to his right, an image of County Clerk Jane Clayton. [1982-09-11] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, work session meeting, 12 August 1982: 4. Monmouth County Archives.

88. At the Monmouth County Fair in Freehold, the band Denyse ’n’ Friends provides the soundtrack for Senior Citizens’ Day as Sister Mary Simon Robb, executive director of the county Office on Aging, looks on, July 29, 1983. Elsewhere on the fairgrounds, the 4-H sheep show was underway. [1983-07-11] “10,000 at Opening of County Fair.” Asbury Park Press 29 July 1983: B1.

89. Michael Spereda (center), a longtime custodian at the Monmouth County Courthouse and a veteran of World War II’s Battle of the Bulge, shares a laugh with Sheriff Paul Kiernan (top of steps) and unidentified co-workers on the eve of his retirement, August 1979. Spereda’s years of diligent service earned him a certificate of appreciation from the Board of Chosen Freeholders. He died on February 25, 2005, at the age of 92. [1979-08-02] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, regular public meeting, 6 September 1979: 2. Monmouth County Archives.
Obituary for Michael “Mike” R. Spereda. Independent 1 March 2005: <http://independent.gmnews.com/news/2005/0301/Obituaries/>.

90. Mobile Meals. [1973-10-04]

Dorn’s Photography Unlimited

The following photographs were provided for the exhibit by Kathy Dorn Severini of Dorn’s, Inc., a Red Bank photography business established by her father and grandfather in 1937 that closed in 2005. The enterprise eventually included both Dorn’s Photo Shop, a retail store, and Photography Unlimited by Dorn’s, a commercial studio. Dorn’s files include a vast number of negatives, including some made by early Red Bank photographers that the firm acquired over the years or copied from prints brought in by customers. Prints from this “Classic Collection” are still available by contacting Ms. Severini at 732-747-9350. File numbers at the end of the captions are Dorn’s.

91. Debuting in 1877 as a modest wooden footpath – only wide enough to accommodate two abreast – Asbury Park’s boardwalk quickly became a bustling promenade and in the early twentieth century the focal point of the city’s golden age. Pictured here in 1955, the pedestrians thronging the boardwalk on Easter Sunday leave a wide berth to Bill Malick, left, and Vito Petrero, teenagers from Long Branch who were “headed to the Paramount [Movie Theater] to pick up girls.” [2226] Pike, Helen-Chantal. Asbury Park’s Glory Days. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005. iv.
Roberts, Russell, and Rich Youmans. Down the Jersey Shore. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1993. 102.

92. As part of a convention held by the Benevolent Protective Order of the Elks in Asbury Park, a contingent of police officers brings up the rear of a parade procession (photograph undated). The Elks long maintained a strong presence in Asbury Park, symbolized by the extravagant clubhouse they built in 1915, complete with an elegant dance hall and a medical clinic for children – but in the wake of this rapid expansion, the local chapter went broke during the Depression and had to sell off its headquarters. [981] Pike, Helen-Chantal. Asbury Park’s Glory Days. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005. 176.

93. Asbury Park youths in 1948 enjoy one of the boardwalk’s amenities – the carousel. [1125]

94. [2 photographs.] The burnt-out cruise ship Morro Castle washed up on a sandbar near the Asbury Park Convention Center in a strange postscript to a major sea disaster. Named after a fortress overlooking Havana Harbor, the Castle ferried vacationers between New York and Cuba until fire broke out in a writing-room locker on September 8, 1934. As the blaze raced through the ship’s highly flammable plywood construction, local boat owners aided the Coast Guard in rescuing survivors. Of 548 on board, 137 passengers and crew perished. Authorities sought to haul the ship to New York for forensic examination, but when a cable snapped, the Castle went adrift and eventually landed in Asbury Park. Thousands headed to the shore to see the massive ship; for $10, they could even set foot on it. While the company that owned the Morro Castle was found guilty of negligence amid allegations that gross incompetence cost passengers their lives, the direct cause of the maritime tragedy remains shrouded in mystery. [3076] Mappen, Marc. “Morro Castle.” Encyclopedia of New Jersey. Eds. Maxine M. Lurie and Marc Mappen. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2004. 542.

95. See #94.

96. Red Bank Orioles, Monmouth County Champions, 1921. According to historian Randall Gabrielan, this semi-pro team “actually played in Tinton Falls, on the border with Red Bank, on the south side of Newman Springs Road. I have never seen a picture of Oriole Park, although I searched as I wanted one for my Tinton Falls book. The outline of the stands and its precise location do appear on the Sanborn map.” [824] Randall Gabrielan, E-mail, August 31, 2005.

97. [Two photographs.] Two views of Broad Street, 1890 and 1951, document change and continuity along Red Bank’s chief thoroughfare. While old-fashioned “dry goods” shops gave way to more modern storefronts and horse-drawn wagons and sleighs yielded to the automobile, Broad Street never failed to buzz with commercial and cultural life. [1608 & 313]

98. See #97.

99. Horse-drawn wagons pull up to the Globe Hotel at 20 East Front Street, Red Bank, in 1908. The Globe, founded in 1844 by Tobias Hendrickson, was once a popular resort for vacationers and revelers, hosting swanky “social club” parties along with Democratic and Republican primaries and even a banquet commemorating the Monmouth Poultry Show. In 1936, the original structure burnt to the ground, but the Globe was soon rebuilt; today it remains a downtown Red Bank fixture – not as a hotel but as a lively sports bar. (Note the banners decorating the hotel in the photograph: they may have marked the 1908 separation of Red Bank Borough from Shrewsbury Township.) [193] “A Hot Triangular Fight Likely,” New York Times 22 April 1890: 1.
“A New-Jersey Social Event,” New York Times 30 December 1888: 9.
“4 Saved from Fire at a Jersey Hotel,” New York Times 20 December 1936: 20.
“Given the Lie: An Exciting Scene at a Shrewsbury Primary,” New York Times 8 September 1889: 2.
“Red Bank Poultry Show Closes,” New York Times 30 January 1910: S2.
Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey’s Civil Boundaries: 1606 – 1968. Trenton: Bureau of Geology and Topography, 1969. 184.

100. Since opening night on November 11, 1926, the Carlton Theater in Red Bank – today the non-profit Count Basie Theatre – has been a downtown landmark. Originally called the State Theater but renamed at the last minute (the word “State” remains engraved on the building’s façade to this day), the Carlton offered movies, vaudeville shows, and orchestra performances in a richly appointed “architectural triumph,” in the words of the Red Bank Register. After going out of business in 1970, the theater was acquired by the Monmouth County Arts Council and repurposed as a cultural center for the whole community. In this 1950 photo, three boys wait outside the theater, apparently eager to see one of the featured motion pictures – Conspirator, an Elizabeth Taylor film about a Soviet secret agent, and Barricade, a Western. [600] “Barricade.” <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042230/>.
“Conspirator.” <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0041260/>.
“Count Basie Theatre History.” <http://www.countbasietheatre.org/
history.php>.

101. This 1912 photo reveals a lost relic of Red Bank transit history: the electric trolley line that ran throughout the borough and into surrounding areas like Rumson and Long Branch. Responding to an unmet demand for local public transportation at a time before the popularization of the automobile, the trolley proved a boon for Red Bank retailers but a frustration for its owners. Three firms – the Atlantic Highlands, Red Bank, and Long Branch Electric Railway, the Monmouth County Electric Company, and the Jersey Central Traction Company – all attempted to profit from the traffic, but none with much success. Ultimately the advent of local bus service in 1922 brought a close to the brief era in which electric rail cars shared Broad Street with bicycles and horse-drawn buggies. [104] Labrecque, Theodore J. “Clang Went Red Bank’s Trolleys.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 96-101.
Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Red Bank. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995.

102. Originally built in 1847 at a cost of $2,135.59, Hubbard’s Bridge spans the Navesink River to connect Red Bank to Middletown by way of West Front Street. Rebuilt at least three times in its history and often languishing in disrepair – most dramatically in 1915 after a ten-ton truck fell through the old wooden structure – the bridge is currently undergoing a decade-long, $1.1 million overhaul. This photograph by Andrew R. Coleman, c. 1900, shows the bridge before it became a major automotive thoroughfare. Note the advertisement across the river promoting the Bamberger’s department store in Newark: In the early 1900s, it was a major destination for Monmouth County shoppers. [117] Cunningham, John T. Newark. Newark: NJ Historical Society, 1966. 195.
Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Middletown Township, vol. III. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1997. 125.
Methot, June. Up and Down the River. Navesink, N.J.: Whip Publishers, 1980. 47.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, vol. II: 374, 432, 450-2, 456, 463. Monmouth County Archives.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, 6/9/1915 – 12/29/1915: 131.
Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 73.
Rizzo, Nina. “$1.1 M Contract Approved for Bridge.” Asbury Park Press 26 January 2004: B3.

103. This 1922 photo by Charles R. D. Foxwell, taken during an “ice carnival” on the Navesink River, highlights what an 1879 newspaper article called “a very popular pastime with a number of our young men”: iceboating. Essentially sailboats equipped with metal runners to glide over the frozen surface of the river, iceboats have long offered high-speed winter amusement – 50 to 100 mph, depending on the wind – to residents of Red Bank and surrounding areas, among the few places in the country with the right climatic conditions to support the vessels. Today, six iceboat regattas are held in the tri-state area, and Red Bank’s North Shrewsbury Ice Boat & Yacht Club, founded in 1880, continues to work to promote the sport.
Foxwell had a photography store in Red Bank, originally in partnership with Bert F. White, whose interest he bought out in 1900. At that time, he was also the Secretary of the Red Bank Camera Club, which met in an adjoining room in the Red Bank Register Building. Club members could use Foxwell’s darkroom. In the spring of 1902, Foxwell introduced postcards to Red Bank and within a few years had 55 different ones for sale. In 1905, Foxwell sent a framed picture with about 30 scenes of the Navesink River to President Theodore Roosevelt. [unnumbered] Lipman, Bob. “What’s an Iceboat?” <http://www.nsibyc.com/what.asp>.
Methot, June. Up and Down the River. Navesink, N.J.: Whip Publishers, 1980. 100-1.
Nordheimer, Jon. “Cold Comfort: Hardy Iceboaters Sail into Winter.” New York Times 23 January 1994: 21.
Saretzky, Gary D. Database on 19th Century New Jersey Photographers.

104. In this picturesque image of the Navesink River in 1914, all manner of vessels crowd the water, from row boats to motor boats to the paddle-wheel steamer, Albertina (at left), a 602-ton ship built in 1882 that took passengers and cargo from Red Bank to New York until a fire destroyed it in 1932. [367] Labrecque, Theodore J. “The Steamboat Era.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 78, 82.

105. The Red Bank train station, today a stop along New Jersey Transit’s North Jersey Coast line, once served the privately owned New York & Long Branch Railroad – but, then as now, its awnings offered weary travelers respite from the rain. Opened for business in 1875 – its maiden voyage boasted then-President Ulysses S. Grant as a passenger – the New York & Long Branch was the first all-rail route to the wildly popular shore area; beach-bound vacationers often stopped on the way to shop at Red Bank, stimulating local commerce. The station, an official New Jersey historic site, was restored to Victorian grandeur in 1976 and is currently undergoing further renovations while continuing to house the Red Bank Visitor’s Center. [2851] Labrecque, Theodore J. “The Coming of the Railroad.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 88-92.
Waldman, Alison. “Station on Track to Former Glory.” Asbury Park Press 12 February 2005: B3.
Whyte, Layli. “New Canopy OK’d for Red Bank Train Station.” The Hub 26 January 2005: <http://hub.gmnews.com/news/2005/0126/
Front_Page/028.html>.

106. This undated photo, c. 1930, recreates a once common sight: a steamboat cruising down the Jersey shore. Behind it is a railroad trestle, built in 1897 but now gone, that linked the military railroad in Sandy Hook to the Central Railroad that traversed Sea Bright and inland areas. At left is Plum Island – today less an island than a peninsula – and in the foreground, stately homes in the Highlands. [1692] Moss, George H. Jr. Another Look at Nauvoo to the Hook. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1990. 137-8.

107. Sea Bright, c. 1955, appears quite narrow in this aerial view, with the black strip of Route 36 running down its center. Today it is even narrower – as a result of erosion and condominium development, the private houses and ample beach located here to the right of the road no longer exist. (The Sea Bright–Rumson Bridge appears at the top, with Gunning Island dividing the Shrewsbury River at left.) [1996] Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1998. 98-9.
Monmouth County Planning Board and Monmouth County Environmental Council. North Coast Environmental Planning Region Ecological Resource Inventory. <http://www.shore.co.monmouth.nj.us/03230planboard/EnvirNorthCst/
north_coast_TOC.htm>, 1999. 64.

108. Cars and pedestrians pack the Asbury Park boardwalk in 1953 on Easter Sunday, the traditional start of the summer vacation season. [2248]

109. The fifth iteration of the Sea Bright–Rumson Bridge takes shape in this 1951 photo. The new bridge, left, replaced the previous one, right, built in the early 1900s. Rumson is at left, Sea Bright at right, with the Sea Bright Beach Club located between the two bridges on the Sea Bright side of the river. [1774] Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1998. 74.
———. Images of America: Rumson. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1996. 12-3.

Monmouth County Historical Association

These photographs were selected for the exhibition by Laura Poll of the Monmouth County Historical Association. Displayed images were drawn from the following collections: Fort Hancock, Bell Labs, Long Branch, John C. Mills, and George H. Moss, Jr., Stereographs. Mr. Moss kindly provided permission to reproduce the stereographs. File numbers are MCHA’s. All MCHA images on exhibit are facsimiles.

110. Soldiers “At Home,” Sandy Hook, 1902. Photograph by Smedley, New York. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-3]

111. “Last Call,” Sandy Hook, 1902. Fort Hancock Collection. Photograph by Smedley, New York. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-4]

112. Built in 1878 as living quarters for ordnance officers at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground, a testing zone for artillery and other weapons, this lovely Second Empire–style building (pictured here c. 1902) eventually became the Officers’ Club for Fort Hancock. Today it is part of the National Park Service’s Gateway National Recreation Area and has sadly languished in disuse and deterioration for years; it sits at the center of an ongoing controversy over how to refurbish relics from Sandy Hook’s military era. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-8] Bearss, Edwin C. Historic Resource Study: The Sandy Hook Proving Ground, 1874–1919. <http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/gate2/hrs3.pdf>: 1983. 2-4 and 40-4.
National Park Service. Fort Hancock Rehabilitation Guidelines. <http://data2.itc.nps.gov/parks/gate/ppdocuments/FH-Rehab Guildlines.PDF> [sic]: 1999. 29.

113. The three men posing in front of this 1899 masonry building in November 1902 were probably unmarried army officers at Fort Hancock in Sandy Hook: the building served as “bachelors’ quarters.” With elegant bay windows and a built-in buffet in the dining room, life on base might not have been too shabby for these swinging singles. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-9] National Park Service. Fort Hancock Rehabilitation Guidelines. <http://data2.itc.nps.gov/parks/gate/ppdocuments/FH-Rehab Guildlines.PDF> [sic]: 1999. 19.

114. The caption on the back of this photo reads: “Sandy Hook Proving Ground, New Jersey. The largest gun in the world being unloaded from the float to two flat cars at the dock, Sandy Hook, New Jersey, December 1902. . . . Statistics of the 16” rifle. . . Length 49 ½ feet/Weight 130 tons/. . . Weight of projectile 2,400 lbs. . . /Cost of gun #130,000/ Cost of firing gun $800.00/Tested before 120 officers and prominent men at Sandy Hook Proving Grounds January 17, 1903.” Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-15]

115. The caption on the back of this photo reads: “Sandy Hook New Jersey/Proving Ground 1900 to 1903/16” B.L. Cannon/36 men on gun & I on the ground// This gun was at the Proving Ground for tests and I don’t think that it was adopted or accepted for/or by the Government. R.M. Whipple. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-16]

116. [2 photographs.] The intimidating technology on display here at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, September 4, 1962, helped usher in the era of modern telecommunications. The pictured dish antenna, 18 feet in diameter, served as a ground station for the Telstar I satellite launched just two months earlier to international fascination. Manning the control equipment housed in the white trailer is Bell Labs employee Robert Pecina, testing out two-way voice communication as routed through the new satellite. Today such satellite telephony is routine. Photographer unknown. Bell Labs Collection. [HO-13 & HO-14] Lucent Technologies. “Bell Labs Celebrates 40th Anniversary of the Birth of Modern Telecommunications.” Press release, 10 July 2002. <http://www.lucent.com/press/0702/020710.bla.html>.

117. See #116.

118. It is not known why the steamrollers in the picture were labeled “Suffragist” and “Progressive,” but the signs help date the picture to the early 1900s. At one time, this photo belonged to the Long Branch Chamber of Commerce. Long Branch Collection. [LB-4]

119. [2 photographs.] Construction worker standing on top of a smokestack and a view of the structure from the ground. Arthur P. Hull, Underwood’s Studio, Photographer, 205 Broadway, Long Branch. Long Branch Collection. [LB-5&6]

120. See #119.

121. This picturesque view of the Shrewsbury River at the turn of the century shows the steamboat Elberon, built in 1888 and taken out of service in 1920, docking at a pier in Highland Beach to pick up passengers on their way to New York. (Note that Highland Beach is technically part of Middletown, not Highlands. For a time, and somewhat amusingly, its name was changed to Sandlass Beach, after its owner William Sandlass.) Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] King, John P. Images of America: The Highlands. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 64.
Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 62-8.

122. In this unusual shot of the frozen Navesink River c. 1890, Red Bank locals happily skate, chat, and fine-tune their iceboats (at right), seemingly oblivious to the two huge steamboats, the Sea Bird (left) and the William V. Wilson, frozen into place by the docks. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 58-9.

123. On Matawan Creek c.1910, workers on a barge unload oyster shells onto “dump wagons” for transport to Judson Conover’s lime kiln. Oystering was a very prominent industry in the Raritan Bay area throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, with the Elsworth Company operating a major oyster-shucking plant in Keyport. The empty shells that resulted, amounting to 100,000 to 150,000 bushels per year, had several uses: some were sold to kilns and processed into lime, some were deposited onto oyster seedbeds for young oysters to grow upon, and some filled in local roads before paving. Oystering disappeared from the area in 1925, after polluted waters made many shellfish dangerous to eat. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] MacKenzie, Clyde L. Jr. The Fisheries of Raritan Bay. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1992. 80 and 148.

124. Keyport’s Raritan Hose Co. No. 2, an early fire company founded in 1893, poses for a group photo in front of its Division St. headquarters c. 1900. The organization was an offshoot of the Raritan Guard, a militia established in Keyport during the Civil War. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] Regan, Timothy E. Images of America: Keyport. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 63.
Stephens, Jim. “Collection #135: New Jersey Milita.” <http://www.monmouth.
com/~mcha3/coll135.html>.

125. Passengers disembarking from a steamboat operated by the Central Railroad of New Jersey walk landward, c. 1905, on a pier in Atlantic Highlands that was once a major transportation hub in the area. Shore-dwelling commuters would hop on Central Railroad trains in the morning and head to the pier to make a connecting voyage to New York on the steamboats Monmouth, Asbury Park, and Sandy Hook (visible, left to right, in the background). Today’s commuters mighty envy the luxurious accommodations of yesteryear. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42 Box 3] Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 31-41.

126. Stereographic views, seen in a stereoscope, enabled the user to see the image in 3-D. They were very popular from the late 1850s to the 1920s. This example from the early 1870s shows the Monmouth Park Grand Stand boarded up, with six horses on the track. Produced by New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, Red Bank, Colwell Lane, President, and David N. Carvalho, Manager. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2085]

127. Race horse and groom, c. 1870-1875. Produced by New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, Red Bank (also 5 Atlantic Block, Long Branch), Colwell Lane, President, and David N. Carvalho, Manager. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2105]

128. Three stereographic views reveal some of the many piles of rubble into which over thirty buildings in Keyport were reduced on September 21, 1877. This calamitous blaze resulted in no deaths, but it did spur local residents to organize fire companies and regret not doing so earlier. The images were captured by Ferris C. Lockwood, a photographer with a studio on Throckmorton St. in Freehold. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2111, 2316, and 2317] Moss, George H. Jr. Double Exposure Two: Stereographic Views of the Jersey Shore (1859 to 1910) and Their Relationship to Pioneer Photography. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1995. 102-3.
Regan, Timothy E. Images of America: Keyport. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 57-9.

129. See #128.

130. See #128.

131. Today Monmouth Park in Oceanport is a premier racetrack for thoroughbred horses, but in this stereograph, it was just opening for business on July 30, 1870. The track’s debut, which featured three races and $2,550 in prizes, suffered from low attendance, despite the presence of numerous Tammany Hall politicians who had come from New York to watch. But Monmouth Park managed to survive its opening-day flop, perhaps with the help of promotional photos like this. Stereograph by G. W. Pach, Pach Series #91. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection [Coll. 84, 2300]

Moss, George H., Jr. & Karen L. Schnitzspahn. Those Innocent Years, 1898-1914. Images of the Jersey Shore from the Pach Brothers Collection. Sea Bright: Ploughshore Press, 1993. [History of Pach firm, xii-xvii]

Moss, George H Jr. Twice Told Tales. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 2002. 46-7.

132. “The Race at Monmouth Park, Long Branch, NJ.” Monmouth stereographic photographers had competition from out-of-state firms that had regional or national businesses, like this example. Littleton View Company, Littleton, New Hampshire, View #1272. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 8361]

 

19th Century Monmouth County Photographers

These photographs, obtained from public and private collections, provide examples of work by various photographers active in Monmouth County before 1900. All images are facsimiles, most of them enlarged.

133. George and Emma Sherman, with their sons, George and Richard, Middletown, in front of the family’s farm house, ca. 1880. Photographers: Shear Brothers, Red Bank. Middletown Township Historical Society, courtesy Randall Gabrielan. Little is known of George Sherman, a farmer who lived from 1850 to 1890. The photograph can be dated by the small size of young Richard, who was listed as a year old in the 1880 census. Shear Brothers was a photographic firm that specialized in outdoor photography. One of the brothers, Seth Shear, born about 1850, began wintering in Daytona, Florida, by 1885 and became well known for his photographs there under the nickname, “The Indian River Photographer.” Around 1900, he had a summer studio on the corner of Newark Avenue and Main Street in Bradley Beach. [Copy of photograph courtesy of Randall Gabrielan, from Middletown Township Historical Society.]

134. Child seated with album, ca. 1900. Photographer: William H. Stauffer, Asbury Park. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.
William H. Stauffer was born about 1846 in Pennsylvania to parents also born in that state. By the 1870s (possibly earlier), he was a druggist, apothecary, and photographer on Broad Street in Trenton. He probably began photographing in Asbury Park seasonally in the 1870s. Around 1880, he and his wife Frances moved to Neptune and he relocated his studio to Asbury Park. In fact, the 1880 census erroneously listed him twice, once there and once in Trenton. For most of his subsequent career, Stauffer operated at 304 Cookman Avenue in Asbury Park. He opened a branch studio in Long Branch in 1898.

135. Boy standing with cane, fake tree stump, and painted backdrop, ca. 1890. Facsimile of cabinet card, 6 ½ x 41/2 inches. Photography Studio: White, Photo Artists, Red Bank. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.
William H. White and his son Arthur H. White were born in England in about 1821 and 1852, respectively. By the 1860s, they were photographers known as “White & Son,” operating in Red Bank. The firm eventually branched out to South Amboy, Asbury Park, Ocean Grove, and Lakewood, but most extant examples seen of their work have a Red Bank imprint. The South Amboy studio won an award for best photographic portrait painted over with pastels at the New Jersey State Fair in 1874. Arthur seems to have worked primarily at the White studio at 25-27 Broad Street in Red Bank, and in the surrounding area. In 1880, William White, his wife Anne, Arthur, and his younger sister Alice all lived together in Shrewsbury. On September 11, 1889, a local newspaper reported that Arthur was on the road in a “handsome photo-wagon, which is fitted up with the best instruments for all kinds of outdoor photography.” That same year, Arthur was the only photographer listed in the Red Bank business directory. By April 1893, the White studio in Red Bank had been bought by DeHart & Letson.

136. Child in white dress with fake tree stump and painted backdrop, ca. 1895. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 1/2 inches. Photographers: Augustus V. DeHart and William W. Letson, Portrait and Landscape Photographers, Red Bank.

By April 1893, DeHart and Letson succeeded Arthur H. White as photographers at 27 Broad Street, Red Bank. They apparently bought White’s props: the same fake tree stump in this photograph can also be seen in the example in this exhibit from the White studio. DeHart and Letson remained at this location until1898 when they moved across the street to 26 Broad Street. In 1902, their address was 24 Broad. By 1909, they had branches in Atlantic Highlands (est. June 1897), Lakewood, and Sea Bright. Letson also operated on his own but as far is known, DeHart only worked in partnership with Letson.

In the 1890s, DeHart and Letson advertised a wide variety of types of photographs and mounting styles: platinotypes (1893); Aureole and Mintha mounts, plus printing services for amateurs (1894); life size and combination portraits (1896); Mantillo Petites, $1.25 per dozen, and Regular Petites (“a trifle smaller”), $1.00 per dozen, $.25 extra for Carbonette finish (1897); Cabinet Carbonettes, $5 per dozen (1897); Imperials, $2.50 or $3.00 per dozen (1898); Petite Cards, $1.35 per dozen, and Miniature Carbonettes, $1 per dozen (1899).

The dangers of photographic processing in this period are illustrated by a newspaper article dated July 17, 1901, which stated that Letson “was sweeping out his gallery at Atlantic Highlands a few days ago when he raised a blister on his hand. The blister opened and Mr. Letson got some photographic chemicals in the sore. Blood poisoning set in and Mr. Letson had a very painful hand, though he was not rendered unable to attend to business.”
137. Woman with bonnet and her son with hat, ca. 1870. Carte-de-visite, app. 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: Colwell Lane, Landscape and Portrait Photographer, Red Bank. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.

Colwell (a.k.a. Colville) Lane, born in New Jersey about 1843, was a photographer in Red Bank by 1867, when he paid the $10 annual tax for photography businesses to the Internal Revenue Service. In the 1870 census, he is listed as a white male, 27, living in Shrewsbury Township with his wife Emily, 19, also born in New Jersey, and their infant daughter Nina. Lane reported a net personal worth of $500 that year.

In the early 1870s, Lane founded and became President of the New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, based in Red Bank with a branch in Philadelphia. From 1872 to 1876, it published more than one hundred stereographic views of Monmouth County, as well as a few of South America. David Carvalho, Manager of the Company, was the son of Solomon Carvalho of Baltimore, a painter and pioneer daguerreotypist believed to be the first Jewish photographer in the United States. David and his father traveled to South America, so it is likely that the Carvalhos were responsible for the Company’s South American views. Lane later was in business at 145 Eighth Avenue, New York City, 1888-1890.

138. “Jennie Miller,” in posing chair, ca. 1870. Carte-de-visite, approximately 4 ½ x 2 ¼ inches. Photographer: Ferris C. Lockwood, Artistic Photographer, Freehold. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.

Ferris C. Lockwood was an active professional photographer in Freehold from the late 1860s to the 1880s, making both albumen paper prints and tintypes from glass negatives. He produced portraits, as seen here, as well as stereographs of Freehold and the vicinity, possibly as late as the 1880s. In 1872, Lockwood published a pamphlet, “For Parlor or Pocket. The Photograph Album. All About Photography” (copy at Monmouth County Historical Association), which states that at the Monmouth County Fair he received a “premium for work in the Highest Department of Photography.” The Monmouth Inquirer (1873), reporting the great fire in Freehold, stated, “Lockwood, the Photographer, obtained several fine pictures of the fire from different points, and is doing a good business selling copies for 25 cts. each. Many are purchasing copies to send to their friends.”
Rutgers Special Collections in New Brunswick holds examples of Lockwood stereos of the interiors of Tennent Church and the First Presbyterian Church, Freehold, ca. 1880. A stereo by Lockwood of colonial relics is reproduced in Monmouth County in the Centennial Era: A Pictorial Review (1976), identifying the photographer as a nephew of Superintendent of Schools Samuel Lockwood, who might have been the Samuel Lockwood who was a photographer in Keyport, 1865-1866.

In the 1880 census, Lockwood was listed as 31 years old, born in New York to a father born in England and a mother born in New York, living with his wife Emma (28), born in Long Island to New York-born parents, and their two-year-old daughter, Bessie.
139. “J.O. Buckelew,” boy standing with wicker chair and painted backdrop, ca. 1895. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ¼ inches. Photographer: Arthur L. Hall, Photographer, 22 W. Main Street, Freehold. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association, P007.

The boy in the picture is John Otis Buckelew (1883-1973). Arthur Hall was active as a professional photographer in Freehold from the mid-1890s to 1922. The 1900 Census described him as a photographer, 28, single, born in New York and boarding at the home of Louis Prince on Manalapan Ave., Freehold. He was still single in 1920 according to the census that year. His last known residence was at 26 Hudson Street in Freehold in 1922.

140. “Frank Cottrell,” ca. 1894. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ½ inches. Photographer: John L. Scott, Freehold. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association, P835.
The Knights of Pythias is a fraternal organization chartered by Congress in 1864 to promote peace and healing the divisions of North and South caused by the Civil War. In this portrait, Frank Cottrell poses in his Knights of Pythias uniform. Behind the Pythagorean’s feet can be seen the base of an immobilizer which has a bracket attached to hold his head steady. Cottrell, born about 1854 (too young to have served in the Civil War), was a photographer; he had a studio at 44 South Street in Freehold in the 1870s. According to the 1880 census, he was married and had three children.

John L. Scott, who made the portrait, was active as a photographer in Freehold from 1892 to 1898, with a studio on Throckmorton Street not far from the county government headquarters at the Hall of Records, which at the time also housed the courtrooms and jail. In 1892, he photographed convicted murderer Louis Harriott shortly before his execution for the murder of Annie Leonard. Harriott gave copies of his carte-de-visite portrait to visitors to his cell, one of which is now at the Monmouth County Historical Association.

141. [Front and back of photograph.] Van Brackel Sisters, 1880s. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ½ inches. Photographer: Ferdinand W. Maag, Keyport. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Ferdinand Maag, born in New York in 1865 to German immigrant parents, was active as a photographer in Keyport from no later than 1886 to 1927. The design on the back of Maag’s card photograph is quite typical of studio photographers in the 1880s. Maag describes his business as “Art Photography,” to suggest that his work is of high quality. His statement, “Instantaneous process used exclusively,” is a reference to gelatin dry plate negatives, a technological improvement to collodion wet plate negatives that were popular until about 1880. Maag also includes his address, “Front Street, 3 doors above Post Office,” to direct future customers who see examples of his work.

142. See #141.

143. Husband and wife, ca. 1865. Carte-de-visites, each 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: John Roth, Freehold. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
The earliest established photographer in Freehold was John Roth, whose daguerreotype studio shared space with his jewelry shop, where he sold and repaired watches. Roth was born in Germany about 1821 and emigrated in 1848. He opened his daguerrean rooms in 1853 and expanded his practice to ambrotypes and paper photographs by the end of the decade. After 1872, he seems to have given up professional photography and listed his profession as watchmaker. Roth’s obituary was published in the Philadelphia Photographer in 1874, but the report seems to have been premature: he is listed in the 1875 and 1880 censuses along with his wife and children.
Saretzky, Gary D. “Nineteenth-Century New Jersey Photographers,” New Jersey History, Fall/Winter 2004 (122:3-4), 110.

144. Young man with glasses and mustache, early 1870s. Carte-de-visite, 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: Griffin & Scholl, Freehold. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
E. Scholl is listed as a photographer in the Monmouth County Directory in 1875, but not Griffin, suggesting that their partnership had ended by that time.

145. Fifteen men with a large pot (steaming clams?), September 13, 1914. Image approximately 7×9 inches, mounted. Photographer: Andrew Coleman. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Born in Red Bank on December 5, 1858, Coleman worked in his father’s jewelry business until 1888, when he became interested in photography. He opened his own studio in 1892, moving to several downtown locations over the next twenty years. In 1912, he established his business at the Red Bank Register building and became staff photographer for the newspaper.

146. Young woman resting elbow on log made into a fence. Tintype, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches with paper mat. Photographer: Meeson’s Pleasure Bay Studio, Long Branch, ca. 1900.
Although Charles R. Meeson has not been documented in Long Branch until a 1902 city directory listed him at 187 Broadway, this tintype may be from a few years earlier. The photographer is probably the Charles Meeson who, at the age of three in 1880, emigrated with his parents from England and in 1920 was living in Orange, Essex County, according to the U.S. Census.
During the Victorian era, a number of tintypists operated at the Jersey Shore in the summer season, long after the tintype process, introduced in the 1850s, had lost popularity inland. Even today, having an old fashioned photograph made is still popular at the Shore, although the photographers generally use costumes, rather than an antique process, to achieve a nostalgic experience.
The flimsy paper mats used to present the tintypes sometimes were rubber stamped on the back with the photographer’s name and address, as in this example. Since most of these mats are now lost, it is difficult today to find tintypes with photographer identifications.

147. Woman standing in front of painted backdrop with beach scene, ca. 1900. Tintype, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches with paper mat. Photographer: Isaac Van Tine, Long Branch. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Painted backdrops were used extensively by photographers to suggest place, beginning in the daguerrean era around 1850, and backdrops depicting the ocean are often found in Jersey Shore tintypes. The photographer, Isaac Van Tine, was born in January 1862 in New Jersey and spent his youth in the Trenton area, where his brothers Henry and Peter [Vantine] were also photographers. Isaac had several locations in Long Branch between 1896 and 1902. This tintype is from the one at Cranmer’s Beach, corner Ocean and Chelsea avenues.

148. Two tintypes, one of a man one a woman, from the Jersey Shore, ca. 1900, with painted backdrops depicting sailboats on the water, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: unknown. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Although there is no photographer information regarding these tintypes, they may have come from the same studio and are typical examples of the genre. Although very inexpensive, tintypes are among the most durable of photographic processes. They got their nickname because tin was cheap; actually, they are made on iron plates and their more proper name is ferrotype. In the original process, the photographer poured sensitized collodion over the plate, which was purchased already painted with Japan black. In these examples, the edges of the plate were covered by the plateholder during exposure, so they remained black.

149. See #148.

150. Tintype of standing woman with fancy hat in front of painted backdrop, ca. 1900, with painted backdrop depicting forest and mountains, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches.. Photographer: Edward Lippencott, Asbury Park. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
As is the case with a number of photographers who operated in Monmouth County in this period, no definite information has been found about Lippencott. The paper mat provided the identification.

151. Oval mounted albumen print of game of croquet, including George and Josephine Hoey, and four other children, ca. 1870. Photographer: Gustavus Pach, Long Branch. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association.
The photographer of this charming view of a by-gone age became the most prolific 19th century photographer in Monmouth County. A native of Berlin, Gustavus V. Pach (1845 – 1904), was one of five brothers who in some way engaged in photography. An older brother, Morris, was Gustavus’s first partner in the 1860s and 1870s. The Pachs began photographing in Long Branch from a mobile wagon in 1866 and opened a studio the following year. They are highly regarded for their stereo views, some also issued in other formats, as well as for thousands of fine portraits. Among their subjects were prominent summer residents of Long Branch, including George Jay Gould, Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, and Mark Twain; they also photographed the houses and families of the rich and famous. As their business grew, the Pachs hired cameramen to make some of the photos that carried the Pach imprint.
In 1870, subsequent to the establishment of their Long Branch studio, Pach Brothers opened another in New York City, which beginning in 1903 was under the direction of the youngest brother, Gotthelf (born 1851 – died 1925). The New York studio went out of family ownership in 1966 but continued operations as Pach Brothers until the 1990s. Pach was thus one of the longest-lasting photography businesses in the United States, along with Bachrach’s and Sarony’s, both of which are still in existence but which were not active in nineteenth-century New Jersey.
In addition to New York and Long Branch, Pach Brothers managed studios in Ocean County, Dover Township (1864), Jones River (1865), and Toms River (1864-65, 1874-75), as well as in Poughkeepsie, New York (1879-80). One of their specialties was college portraits, such as those of Princeton University classes they took for many years beginning in 1879; they operated in other college towns as well. By 1888, they were conducting business in Long Branch, Ocean Grove, and Princeton, New Jersey; New Haven and Middletown, Connecticut; Cambridge, Amherst, Wellesley, and Williamstown, Massachusetts; New York City and West Point (where through the influence of President Grant, they photographed the classes for more than thirty years); Hanover, New Hampshire; and Easton, Pennsylvania.
In 1896, Gustavus Pach opened another Ocean County studio in Lakewood, New Jersey. After his death in 1904, the Lakewood firm was run by his wife and children living at the studio/residence, with George A. M. Morris, another German immigrant, as chief photographer. (A branch continued on Brighton Avenue in Long Branch.) George Morris (born 1879 – died 1948) began working for Gustavus in 1898 and eventually took over the New Jersey Pach Brothers business, retaining the Pach name until about 1918. George H. Moss, Jr., who with Karen Schnitzspahn wrote the authoritative book about the Pachs, Those Innocent Years, acquired a large collection of Pach’s glass-plate negatives from George Morris’s son; this collection, along with a smaller one donated by Schnitzspahn, is being preserved by the Monmouth County Historical Association.
Saretzky, Gary D. “Nineteenth-Century New Jersey Photographers,” New Jersey History, Fall/Winter 2004 (122:3-4), 111-112.

Photographs by an Amateur, Oscar Hennings

These prints were made from scans of 4×5 inch glass plate negatives, probably taken by a young man named Oscar Hennings between 1899 and 1912. Little is known about Hennings except that he lived in Jersey City and is listed in city directories as a clerk. (Other family members, most of whom were born in Germany, or had German-born parents, lived at the same addresses.) Hennings kept a log of his photographs that describe 183 numbered plates (some missing) in the collection, which is on loan to the Monmouth County Archives by a private collector. The log indicates that Hennings took a number of views in Monmouth County, including in Asbury Park, Highland Beach, and Long Branch. He did not record the places for all of his photographs but others were taken in Jersey City, the New York City harbor area, Lake Hopatcong, the Catskills, eastern Pennsylvania, and elsewhere in the region. In all likelihood, Hennings traveled to these places on weekends or on holidays and recorded people and places in which he was interested. He was careful to record for each photograph his exposure time and f-stop (lens opening); in later years, he also wrote down the month, time of day, and the light quality (hazy, bright, etc.). The photographs by Hennings are presented here as those of an enthusiastic amateur at the turn of the century who, like many others, visited Monmouth County for recreational purposes. Titles are taken from Hennings’ log.

152. “Mama Sifting the Ashes.” Oscar’s mother goes through the ashes to find “clinkers,” bits of coal that have not burned. [Hennings, #17]

153. “A Card Party.” “Mama” is in the center. The man on the left of the photo is probably Oscar’s father. [Hennings, #50]

154. “Mabel and Edna Laughing.” Perhaps the girls are laughing because they are being photographed wearing identical clothing. [Hennings, #35]

155. [Two photographs.] “Casting Pigs at Wharton Blast Furnace” and “Clearing Out Slag from Ladles,” circa 1908. The Port Oram Iron Company built the Port Oram Blast Furnace (later known as the Wharton Furnace) in 1868. It was located in Wharton, Morris County, near the Morris Canal and operated until 1925. [Hennings, #122, 123]

156. See #155.

157. “The Beach at Long Branch.” In Hennings’ log book, the immediately preceding image was “The Iron Pier at Long Branch,” which unfortunately is missing from the collection. In all likelihood, this image was taken from the Pier, looking north. [Hennings, #55]

158. “Sound Steamer ‘Priscilla’ of the Fall River Line.” At 440 feet long, the Priscilla was one of the largest and most lavishly appointed ships built to take

 

77. County Historian George Moss Jr. and County Clerk Jane Clayton seem pleased with an old court document stored at the Monmouth County Archives on the eve of its opening to the public in August 1994. Home to hundreds of thousands of county records from as far back as the seventeenth century, the Archives was built in 1987 in response to public outrage over the appalling storage conditions of many historic local documents, some of which were kept in a squirrel-infested warehouse, where they were used as fuel for vagrants’ fires. Between 1987 and 1994, only a few scholars used the archives by appointment; today it serves hundreds of patrons every year. [1994-08-02] Katell, Barbara. “County Losing Its Old Records to Damp Neglect.” Red Bank Register 7 September 1979. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1979.”
Sapia, Joseph. “Opening the Books.” Asbury Park Press 17 August 1994: C1.
Saretzky, Gary D. Oral interview, 12 August 2005.

78. Carrying out a dedication ceremony for the new Monmouth County Library Headquarters in Manalapan are (left to right) Renee Swartz, chairwoman of the Library Commissioners; John Livingstone, Library Director; and Freeholder Harry Larrison, Jr. The Manalapan library was intended to be for western Monmouth what the Shrewsbury library was for eastern Monmouth: a cultural hub for the whole community. Today it circulates more than a million books and media items per year, a statewide record. [1987-04-07] Fontaine, Hildy Wils. “The Secret Is Now Out – Out West, That Is.” Red Bank Register 28 April 1987. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”
Rifkin, Jonathan. “Check This Out!: Monmouth County Library Loans 1 Millionth Item.” Asbury Park Press 3 January 2002: Marlboro-Manalapan Reporter, 1.

79. Renee Swartz, chairperson of the Monmouth County Library Commission, hands now former County Library Director John Livingstone a silver bowl commemorating his election to the presidency of the New Jersey Library Association in 1977. Livingstone sought to use that post to promote statewide Monmouth County’s model of library as “community cultural center” – a model he had helped create by founding Jazz Week. Library director from 1969 to 1991, Livingstone went on to become the State Librarian until his retirement in 2001. [1977-00-25] “Livingstone State Unit Head.” Red Bank Register 9 May 1977. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”
Newman, Rhoad. Interview with John Livingstone, March 13, 2000. Remembering the 20th Century: An Oral History of Monmouth County. .

80. Renowned jazz pianist Marian McPartland looks demure during a performance at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library in Shrewsbury, November 23, 1975. McPartland, host of the long-running National Public Radio program, “Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz,” entertained an audience of 800 as part of the Library’s third annual Jazz Week. [1975-11-02] Jacobson, Carol. “Library Jazz Fete Success Exceeds All Expectations.” Red Bank Register 24 February 1975. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 3, “Freeholders: 1975.”
National Public Radio. “Meet Marian McPartland.” programs/pianojazz/meetmarian.html>.

81. Two disabled residents of Monmouth County – Charles Vreeland (left) and Alex Buono, acting director of the county’s Office of the Handicapped – try out a new ramp installed at the Eastern Branch of the Monmouth County Library in Shrewsbury, August 20, 1979. There to insure a smooth maiden voyage are Library Director John Livingstone (left) and Freeholder Allan MacDonald. [1979-08-14] “Ride the Ramp.” Red Bank Register 21 August 1979. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 5, “Library.”

82. Freeholder Allan MacDonald, who served on the county board from 1979 to 1981, lends an arm to the Central Jersey Blood Center, March 14, 1979. [1979-03-04]

83. Government officials and community leaders reach out to touch a few of the 500 dolls clothed and personalized as holiday gifts for underprivileged children in a joint venture of the Monmouth County Board of Social Services and the New Jersey Division of the Salvation Army, December 15, 1981. Posing from left to right are Major Carl Schoch of the Salvation Army, Board of Social Services Director Louis Armour, Alfred Swenarton of the Salvation Army, and Freeholder and Assemblyman-Elect Joseph Palaia. [1981-12-01] “Party for Dolls.” Red Bank Register 30 December 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 7, “Social Services Board.”

84. A life-long public servant and Monmouth resident, Theodore J. Narozanick is currently serving his seventh three-year term on the Board of Chosen Freeholders. At the time of this November 1973 photo, however, he was working as the county’s budget director; within months he would be appointed the first county administrator, paving the way to his successful run for freeholder in 1986. [1973-11-08] McCarthy, Stephen. “Old Hand in Government Moves into New Role.” Red Bank Register 7 January 1986. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 2, “Freeholders: 1986.”
Monmouth County Department of Public Information. “Freeholder Theodore J. Narozanick.” narozanick_-_bio.htm>.
“Narozanick Sworn in as County Administrator.” Red Bank Register 6 March 1974. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 1, “Administrator.”

85. County Finance Director Mark Acker smiles for the camera, August 1984. As the head of the Department of Finance, a post he has held since the time of the photo, he oversees the county’s budget and manages its debt. [1984-08-08]

86. The Rumson Borough Council gets down to business on January 1, 1981, the first day of a new term. This all-Republican group included the municipality’s first female council member. Pictured left to right: William H. Hyatt, George H. Moss, Jr., Harry Barbee, Jr., Mayor Charles F. Paterno, Carolyn Callen, and Charles S. Callman.
[Photo by Don Lordi / Red Bank Register Photo Collection at the Monmouth County Archives, 1981-01-01 RBR] “All-Republican Rumson Council Finishes Facelift.” Red Bank Register 2 January 1981. From Monmouth County Archives, Red Bank Register clippings microfilm, reel 12, “Rumson Council.”

87. At the old Seaview Square mall in Ocean Township, freeholders’ faces greet visitors to a “Meet Your County” display organized by the Department of Public Information and Tourism, September 15, 1982. At left is the visage of Freeholder Harry Larrison, Jr.; to his right, an image of County Clerk Jane Clayton. [1982-09-11] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, work session meeting, 12 August 1982: 4. Monmouth County Archives.

88. At the Monmouth County Fair in Freehold, the band Denyse ’n’ Friends provides the soundtrack for Senior Citizens’ Day as Sister Mary Simon Robb, executive director of the county Office on Aging, looks on, July 29, 1983. Elsewhere on the fairgrounds, the 4-H sheep show was underway. [1983-07-11] “10,000 at Opening of County Fair.” Asbury Park Press 29 July 1983: B1.

89. Michael Spereda (center), a longtime custodian at the Monmouth County Courthouse and a veteran of World War II’s Battle of the Bulge, shares a laugh with Sheriff Paul Kiernan (top of steps) and unidentified co-workers on the eve of his retirement, August 1979. Spereda’s years of diligent service earned him a certificate of appreciation from the Board of Chosen Freeholders. He died on February 25, 2005, at the age of 92. [1979-08-02] Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, regular public meeting, 6 September 1979: 2. Monmouth County Archives.
Obituary for Michael “Mike” R. Spereda. Independent 1 March 2005: .

90. Mobile Meals. [1973-10-04]

Dorn’s Photography Unlimited

The following photographs were provided for the exhibit by Kathy Dorn Severini of Dorn’s, Inc., a Red Bank photography business established by her father and grandfather in 1937 that closed in 2005. The enterprise eventually included both Dorn’s Photo Shop, a retail store, and Photography Unlimited by Dorn’s, a commercial studio. Dorn’s files include a vast number of negatives, including some made by early Red Bank photographers that the firm acquired over the years or copied from prints brought in by customers. Prints from this “Classic Collection” are still available by contacting Ms. Severini at 732-747-9350. File numbers at the end of the captions are Dorn’s.

91. Debuting in 1877 as a modest wooden footpath – only wide enough to accommodate two abreast – Asbury Park’s boardwalk quickly became a bustling promenade and in the early twentieth century the focal point of the city’s golden age. Pictured here in 1955, the pedestrians thronging the boardwalk on Easter Sunday leave a wide berth to Bill Malick, left, and Vito Petrero, teenagers from Long Branch who were “headed to the Paramount [Movie Theater] to pick up girls.” [2226] Pike, Helen-Chantal. Asbury Park’s Glory Days. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005. iv.
Roberts, Russell, and Rich Youmans. Down the Jersey Shore. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1993. 102.

92. As part of a convention held by the Benevolent Protective Order of the Elks in Asbury Park, a contingent of police officers brings up the rear of a parade procession (photograph undated). The Elks long maintained a strong presence in Asbury Park, symbolized by the extravagant clubhouse they built in 1915, complete with an elegant dance hall and a medical clinic for children – but in the wake of this rapid expansion, the local chapter went broke during the Depression and had to sell off its headquarters. [981] Pike, Helen-Chantal. Asbury Park’s Glory Days. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005. 176.

93. Asbury Park youths in 1948 enjoy one of the boardwalk’s amenities – the carousel. [1125]

94. [2 photographs.] The burnt-out cruise ship Morro Castle washed up on a sandbar near the Asbury Park Convention Center in a strange postscript to a major sea disaster. Named after a fortress overlooking Havana Harbor, the Castle ferried vacationers between New York and Cuba until fire broke out in a writing-room locker on September 8, 1934. As the blaze raced through the ship’s highly flammable plywood construction, local boat owners aided the Coast Guard in rescuing survivors. Of 548 on board, 137 passengers and crew perished. Authorities sought to haul the ship to New York for forensic examination, but when a cable snapped, the Castle went adrift and eventually landed in Asbury Park. Thousands headed to the shore to see the massive ship; for $10, they could even set foot on it. While the company that owned the Morro Castle was found guilty of negligence amid allegations that gross incompetence cost passengers their lives, the direct cause of the maritime tragedy remains shrouded in mystery. [3076] Mappen, Marc. “Morro Castle.” Encyclopedia of New Jersey. Eds. Maxine M. Lurie and Marc Mappen. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2004. 542.

95. See #94.

96. Red Bank Orioles, Monmouth County Champions, 1921. According to historian Randall Gabrielan, this semi-pro team “actually played in Tinton Falls, on the border with Red Bank, on the south side of Newman Springs Road. I have never seen a picture of Oriole Park, although I searched as I wanted one for my Tinton Falls book. The outline of the stands and its precise location do appear on the Sanborn map.” [824] Randall Gabrielan, E-mail, August 31, 2005.

97. [Two photographs.] Two views of Broad Street, 1890 and 1951, document change and continuity along Red Bank’s chief thoroughfare. While old-fashioned “dry goods” shops gave way to more modern storefronts and horse-drawn wagons and sleighs yielded to the automobile, Broad Street never failed to buzz with commercial and cultural life. [1608 & 313]

98. See #97.

99. Horse-drawn wagons pull up to the Globe Hotel at 20 East Front Street, Red Bank, in 1908. The Globe, founded in 1844 by Tobias Hendrickson, was once a popular resort for vacationers and revelers, hosting swanky “social club” parties along with Democratic and Republican primaries and even a banquet commemorating the Monmouth Poultry Show. In 1936, the original structure burnt to the ground, but the Globe was soon rebuilt; today it remains a downtown Red Bank fixture – not as a hotel but as a lively sports bar. (Note the banners decorating the hotel in the photograph: they may have marked the 1908 separation of Red Bank Borough from Shrewsbury Township.) [193] “A Hot Triangular Fight Likely,” New York Times 22 April 1890: 1.
“A New-Jersey Social Event,” New York Times 30 December 1888: 9.
“4 Saved from Fire at a Jersey Hotel,” New York Times 20 December 1936: 20.
“Given the Lie: An Exciting Scene at a Shrewsbury Primary,” New York Times 8 September 1889: 2.
“Red Bank Poultry Show Closes,” New York Times 30 January 1910: S2.
Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey’s Civil Boundaries: 1606 – 1968. Trenton: Bureau of Geology and Topography, 1969. 184.

100. Since opening night on November 11, 1926, the Carlton Theater in Red Bank – today the non-profit Count Basie Theatre – has been a downtown landmark. Originally called the State Theater but renamed at the last minute (the word “State” remains engraved on the building’s façade to this day), the Carlton offered movies, vaudeville shows, and orchestra performances in a richly appointed “architectural triumph,” in the words of the Red Bank Register. After going out of business in 1970, the theater was acquired by the Monmouth County Arts Council and repurposed as a cultural center for the whole community. In this 1950 photo, three boys wait outside the theater, apparently eager to see one of the featured motion pictures – Conspirator, an Elizabeth Taylor film about a Soviet secret agent, and Barricade, a Western. [600] “Barricade.” .
“Conspirator.” .
“Count Basie Theatre History.” history.php>.

101. This 1912 photo reveals a lost relic of Red Bank transit history: the electric trolley line that ran throughout the borough and into surrounding areas like Rumson and Long Branch. Responding to an unmet demand for local public transportation at a time before the popularization of the automobile, the trolley proved a boon for Red Bank retailers but a frustration for its owners. Three firms – the Atlantic Highlands, Red Bank, and Long Branch Electric Railway, the Monmouth County Electric Company, and the Jersey Central Traction Company – all attempted to profit from the traffic, but none with much success. Ultimately the advent of local bus service in 1922 brought a close to the brief era in which electric rail cars shared Broad Street with bicycles and horse-drawn buggies. [104] Labrecque, Theodore J. “Clang Went Red Bank’s Trolleys.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 96-101.
Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Red Bank. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995.

102. Originally built in 1847 at a cost of $2,135.59, Hubbard’s Bridge spans the Navesink River to connect Red Bank to Middletown by way of West Front Street. Rebuilt at least three times in its history and often languishing in disrepair – most dramatically in 1915 after a ten-ton truck fell through the old wooden structure – the bridge is currently undergoing a decade-long, $1.1 million overhaul. This photograph by Andrew R. Coleman, c. 1900, shows the bridge before it became a major automotive thoroughfare. Note the advertisement across the river promoting the Bamberger’s department store in Newark: In the early 1900s, it was a major destination for Monmouth County shoppers. [117] Cunningham, John T. Newark. Newark: NJ Historical Society, 1966. 195.
Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Middletown Township, vol. III. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1997. 125.
Methot, June. Up and Down the River. Navesink, N.J.: Whip Publishers, 1980. 47.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, vol. II: 374, 432, 450-2, 456, 463. Monmouth County Archives.
Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Minutes, 6/9/1915 – 12/29/1915: 131.
Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 73.
Rizzo, Nina. “$1.1 M Contract Approved for Bridge.” Asbury Park Press 26 January 2004: B3.

103. This 1922 photo by Charles R. D. Foxwell, taken during an “ice carnival” on the Navesink River, highlights what an 1879 newspaper article called “a very popular pastime with a number of our young men”: iceboating. Essentially sailboats equipped with metal runners to glide over the frozen surface of the river, iceboats have long offered high-speed winter amusement – 50 to 100 mph, depending on the wind – to residents of Red Bank and surrounding areas, among the few places in the country with the right climatic conditions to support the vessels. Today, six iceboat regattas are held in the tri-state area, and Red Bank’s North Shrewsbury Ice Boat & Yacht Club, founded in 1880, continues to work to promote the sport.
Foxwell had a photography store in Red Bank, originally in partnership with Bert F. White, whose interest he bought out in 1900. At that time, he was also the Secretary of the Red Bank Camera Club, which met in an adjoining room in the Red Bank Register Building. Club members could use Foxwell’s darkroom. In the spring of 1902, Foxwell introduced postcards to Red Bank and within a few years had 55 different ones for sale. In 1905, Foxwell sent a framed picture with about 30 scenes of the Navesink River to President Theodore Roosevelt. [unnumbered] Lipman, Bob. “What’s an Iceboat?” .
Methot, June. Up and Down the River. Navesink, N.J.: Whip Publishers, 1980. 100-1.
Nordheimer, Jon. “Cold Comfort: Hardy Iceboaters Sail into Winter.” New York Times 23 January 1994: 21.
Saretzky, Gary D. Database on 19th Century New Jersey Photographers.

104. In this picturesque image of the Navesink River in 1914, all manner of vessels crowd the water, from row boats to motor boats to the paddle-wheel steamer, Albertina (at left), a 602-ton ship built in 1882 that took passengers and cargo from Red Bank to New York until a fire destroyed it in 1932. [367] Labrecque, Theodore J. “The Steamboat Era.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 78, 82.

105. The Red Bank train station, today a stop along New Jersey Transit’s North Jersey Coast line, once served the privately owned New York & Long Branch Railroad – but, then as now, its awnings offered weary travelers respite from the rain. Opened for business in 1875 – its maiden voyage boasted then-President Ulysses S. Grant as a passenger – the New York & Long Branch was the first all-rail route to the wildly popular shore area; beach-bound vacationers often stopped on the way to shop at Red Bank, stimulating local commerce. The station, an official New Jersey historic site, was restored to Victorian grandeur in 1976 and is currently undergoing further renovations while continuing to house the Red Bank Visitor’s Center. [2851] Labrecque, Theodore J. “The Coming of the Railroad.” In Phillips, Helen C. Red Bank on the Navesink. Red Bank: Caesarea Press, 1977. 88-92.
Waldman, Alison. “Station on Track to Former Glory.” Asbury Park Press 12 February 2005: B3.
Whyte, Layli. “New Canopy OK’d for Red Bank Train Station.” The Hub 26 January 2005: Front_Page/028.html>.

106. This undated photo, c. 1930, recreates a once common sight: a steamboat cruising down the Jersey shore. Behind it is a railroad trestle, built in 1897 but now gone, that linked the military railroad in Sandy Hook to the Central Railroad that traversed Sea Bright and inland areas. At left is Plum Island – today less an island than a peninsula – and in the foreground, stately homes in the Highlands. [1692] Moss, George H. Jr. Another Look at Nauvoo to the Hook. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1990. 137-8.

107. Sea Bright, c. 1955, appears quite narrow in this aerial view, with the black strip of Route 36 running down its center. Today it is even narrower – as a result of erosion and condominium development, the private houses and ample beach located here to the right of the road no longer exist. (The Sea Bright–Rumson Bridge appears at the top, with Gunning Island dividing the Shrewsbury River at left.) [1996] Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1998. 98-9.
Monmouth County Planning Board and Monmouth County Environmental Council. North Coast Environmental Planning Region Ecological Resource Inventory. north_coast_TOC.htm>, 1999. 64.

108. Cars and pedestrians pack the Asbury Park boardwalk in 1953 on Easter Sunday, the traditional start of the summer vacation season. [2248]

109. The fifth iteration of the Sea Bright–Rumson Bridge takes shape in this 1951 photo. The new bridge, left, replaced the previous one, right, built in the early 1900s. Rumson is at left, Sea Bright at right, with the Sea Bright Beach Club located between the two bridges on the Sea Bright side of the river. [1774] Gabrielan, Randall. Images of America: Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1998. 74.
———. Images of America: Rumson. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1996. 12-3.

Monmouth County Historical Association

These photographs were selected for the exhibition by Laura Poll of the Monmouth County Historical Association. Displayed images were drawn from the following collections: Fort Hancock, Bell Labs, Long Branch, John C. Mills, and George H. Moss, Jr., Stereographs. Mr. Moss kindly provided permission to reproduce the stereographs. File numbers are MCHA’s. All MCHA images on exhibit are facsimiles.

110. Soldiers “At Home,” Sandy Hook, 1902. Photograph by Smedley, New York. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-3]

111. “Last Call,” Sandy Hook, 1902. Fort Hancock Collection. Photograph by Smedley, New York. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-4]

112. Built in 1878 as living quarters for ordnance officers at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground, a testing zone for artillery and other weapons, this lovely Second Empire–style building (pictured here c. 1902) eventually became the Officers’ Club for Fort Hancock. Today it is part of the National Park Service’s Gateway National Recreation Area and has sadly languished in disuse and deterioration for years; it sits at the center of an ongoing controversy over how to refurbish relics from Sandy Hook’s military era. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-8] Bearss, Edwin C. Historic Resource Study: The Sandy Hook Proving Ground, 1874–1919. : 1983. 2-4 and 40-4.
National Park Service. Fort Hancock Rehabilitation Guidelines. [sic]: 1999. 29.

113. The three men posing in front of this 1899 masonry building in November 1902 were probably unmarried army officers at Fort Hancock in Sandy Hook: the building served as “bachelors’ quarters.” With elegant bay windows and a built-in buffet in the dining room, life on base might not have been too shabby for these swinging singles. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-9] National Park Service. Fort Hancock Rehabilitation Guidelines. [sic]: 1999. 19.

114. The caption on the back of this photo reads: “Sandy Hook Proving Ground, New Jersey. The largest gun in the world being unloaded from the float to two flat cars at the dock, Sandy Hook, New Jersey, December 1902. . . . Statistics of the 16” rifle. . . Length 49 ½ feet/Weight 130 tons/. . . Weight of projectile 2,400 lbs. . . /Cost of gun #130,000/ Cost of firing gun $800.00/Tested before 120 officers and prominent men at Sandy Hook Proving Grounds January 17, 1903.” Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-15]

115. The caption on the back of this photo reads: “Sandy Hook New Jersey/Proving Ground 1900 to 1903/16” B.L. Cannon/36 men on gun & I on the ground// This gun was at the Proving Ground for tests and I don’t think that it was adopted or accepted for/or by the Government. R.M. Whipple. Photographer unknown. Fort Hancock Collection. [FO-16]

116. [2 photographs.] The intimidating technology on display here at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, September 4, 1962, helped usher in the era of modern telecommunications. The pictured dish antenna, 18 feet in diameter, served as a ground station for the Telstar I satellite launched just two months earlier to international fascination. Manning the control equipment housed in the white trailer is Bell Labs employee Robert Pecina, testing out two-way voice communication as routed through the new satellite. Today such satellite telephony is routine. Photographer unknown. Bell Labs Collection. [HO-13 & HO-14] Lucent Technologies. “Bell Labs Celebrates 40th Anniversary of the Birth of Modern Telecommunications.” Press release, 10 July 2002. .

117. See #116.

118. It is not known why the steamrollers in the picture were labeled “Suffragist” and “Progressive,” but the signs help date the picture to the early 1900s. At one time, this photo belonged to the Long Branch Chamber of Commerce. Long Branch Collection. [LB-4]

119. [2 photographs.] Construction worker standing on top of a smokestack and a view of the structure from the ground. Arthur P. Hull, Underwood’s Studio, Photographer, 205 Broadway, Long Branch. Long Branch Collection. [LB-5&6]

120. See #119.

121. This picturesque view of the Shrewsbury River at the turn of the century shows the steamboat Elberon, built in 1888 and taken out of service in 1920, docking at a pier in Highland Beach to pick up passengers on their way to New York. (Note that Highland Beach is technically part of Middletown, not Highlands. For a time, and somewhat amusingly, its name was changed to Sandlass Beach, after its owner William Sandlass.) Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] King, John P. Images of America: The Highlands. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 64.
Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 62-8.

122. In this unusual shot of the frozen Navesink River c. 1890, Red Bank locals happily skate, chat, and fine-tune their iceboats (at right), seemingly oblivious to the two huge steamboats, the Sea Bird (left) and the William V. Wilson, frozen into place by the docks. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 58-9.

123. On Matawan Creek c.1910, workers on a barge unload oyster shells onto “dump wagons” for transport to Judson Conover’s lime kiln. Oystering was a very prominent industry in the Raritan Bay area throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, with the Elsworth Company operating a major oyster-shucking plant in Keyport. The empty shells that resulted, amounting to 100,000 to 150,000 bushels per year, had several uses: some were sold to kilns and processed into lime, some were deposited onto oyster seedbeds for young oysters to grow upon, and some filled in local roads before paving. Oystering disappeared from the area in 1925, after polluted waters made many shellfish dangerous to eat. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] MacKenzie, Clyde L. Jr. The Fisheries of Raritan Bay. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1992. 80 and 148.

124. Keyport’s Raritan Hose Co. No. 2, an early fire company founded in 1893, poses for a group photo in front of its Division St. headquarters c. 1900. The organization was an offshoot of the Raritan Guard, a militia established in Keyport during the Civil War. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42, Box 3] Regan, Timothy E. Images of America: Keyport. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 63.
Stephens, Jim. “Collection #135: New Jersey Milita.” com/~mcha3/coll135.html>.

125. Passengers disembarking from a steamboat operated by the Central Railroad of New Jersey walk landward, c. 1905, on a pier in Atlantic Highlands that was once a major transportation hub in the area. Shore-dwelling commuters would hop on Central Railroad trains in the morning and head to the pier to make a connecting voyage to New York on the steamboats Monmouth, Asbury Park, and Sandy Hook (visible, left to right, in the background). Today’s commuters mighty envy the luxurious accommodations of yesteryear. Photographer unknown. John C. Mills Collection. [Coll. 42 Box 3] Moss, George H., Jr. Steamboat to the Shore. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1991. 31-41.

126. Stereographic views, seen in a stereoscope, enabled the user to see the image in 3-D. They were very popular from the late 1850s to the 1920s. This example from the early 1870s shows the Monmouth Park Grand Stand boarded up, with six horses on the track. Produced by New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, Red Bank, Colwell Lane, President, and David N. Carvalho, Manager. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2085]

127. Race horse and groom, c. 1870-1875. Produced by New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, Red Bank (also 5 Atlantic Block, Long Branch), Colwell Lane, President, and David N. Carvalho, Manager. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2105]

128. Three stereographic views reveal some of the many piles of rubble into which over thirty buildings in Keyport were reduced on September 21, 1877. This calamitous blaze resulted in no deaths, but it did spur local residents to organize fire companies and regret not doing so earlier. The images were captured by Ferris C. Lockwood, a photographer with a studio on Throckmorton St. in Freehold. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 2111, 2316, and 2317] Moss, George H. Jr. Double Exposure Two: Stereographic Views of the Jersey Shore (1859 to 1910) and Their Relationship to Pioneer Photography. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 1995. 102-3.
Regan, Timothy E. Images of America: Keyport. Dover, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 1995. 57-9.

129. See #128.

130. See #128.

131. Today Monmouth Park in Oceanport is a premier racetrack for thoroughbred horses, but in this stereograph, it was just opening for business on July 30, 1870. The track’s debut, which featured three races and $2,550 in prizes, suffered from low attendance, despite the presence of numerous Tammany Hall politicians who had come from New York to watch. But Monmouth Park managed to survive its opening-day flop, perhaps with the help of promotional photos like this. Stereograph by G. W. Pach, Pach Series #91. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection [Coll. 84, 2300]

Moss, George H., Jr. & Karen L. Schnitzspahn. Those Innocent Years, 1898-1914. Images of the Jersey Shore from the Pach Brothers Collection. Sea Bright: Ploughshore Press, 1993. [History of Pach firm, xii-xvii]

Moss, George H Jr. Twice Told Tales. Sea Bright: Ploughshare Press, 2002. 46-7.

132. “The Race at Monmouth Park, Long Branch, NJ.” Monmouth stereographic photographers had competition from out-of-state firms that had regional or national businesses, like this example. Littleton View Company, Littleton, New Hampshire, View #1272. George H. Moss Jr. Stereograph Collection. [Coll. 84, 8361]

19th Century Monmouth County Photographers

These photographs, obtained from public and private collections, provide examples of work by various photographers active in Monmouth County before 1900. All images are facsimiles, most of them enlarged.

133. George and Emma Sherman, with their sons, George and Richard, Middletown, in front of the family’s farm house, ca. 1880. Photographers: Shear Brothers, Red Bank. Middletown Township Historical Society, courtesy Randall Gabrielan. Little is known of George Sherman, a farmer who lived from 1850 to 1890. The photograph can be dated by the small size of young Richard, who was listed as a year old in the 1880 census. Shear Brothers was a photographic firm that specialized in outdoor photography. One of the brothers, Seth Shear, born about 1850, began wintering in Daytona, Florida, by 1885 and became well known for his photographs there under the nickname, “The Indian River Photographer.” Around 1900, he had a summer studio on the corner of Newark Avenue and Main Street in Bradley Beach. [Copy of photograph courtesy of Randall Gabrielan, from Middletown Township Historical Society.]

134. Child seated with album, ca. 1900. Photographer: William H. Stauffer, Asbury Park. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.
William H. Stauffer was born about 1846 in Pennsylvania to parents also born in that state. By the 1870s (possibly earlier), he was a druggist, apothecary, and photographer on Broad Street in Trenton. He probably began photographing in Asbury Park seasonally in the 1870s. Around 1880, he and his wife Frances moved to Neptune and he relocated his studio to Asbury Park. In fact, the 1880 census erroneously listed him twice, once there and once in Trenton. For most of his subsequent career, Stauffer operated at 304 Cookman Avenue in Asbury Park. He opened a branch studio in Long Branch in 1898.

135. Boy standing with cane, fake tree stump, and painted backdrop, ca. 1890. Facsimile of cabinet card, 6 ½ x 41/2 inches. Photography Studio: White, Photo Artists, Red Bank. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.
William H. White and his son Arthur H. White were born in England in about 1821 and 1852, respectively. By the 1860s, they were photographers known as “White & Son,” operating in Red Bank. The firm eventually branched out to South Amboy, Asbury Park, Ocean Grove, and Lakewood, but most extant examples seen of their work have a Red Bank imprint. The South Amboy studio won an award for best photographic portrait painted over with pastels at the New Jersey State Fair in 1874. Arthur seems to have worked primarily at the White studio at 25-27 Broad Street in Red Bank, and in the surrounding area. In 1880, William White, his wife Anne, Arthur, and his younger sister Alice all lived together in Shrewsbury. On September 11, 1889, a local newspaper reported that Arthur was on the road in a “handsome photo-wagon, which is fitted up with the best instruments for all kinds of outdoor photography.” That same year, Arthur was the only photographer listed in the Red Bank business directory. By April 1893, the White studio in Red Bank had been bought by DeHart & Letson.

136. Child in white dress with fake tree stump and painted backdrop, ca. 1895. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 1/2 inches. Photographers: Augustus V. DeHart and William W. Letson, Portrait and Landscape Photographers, Red Bank.

By April 1893, DeHart and Letson succeeded Arthur H. White as photographers at 27 Broad Street, Red Bank. They apparently bought White’s props: the same fake tree stump in this photograph can also be seen in the example in this exhibit from the White studio. DeHart and Letson remained at this location until1898 when they moved across the street to 26 Broad Street. In 1902, their address was 24 Broad. By 1909, they had branches in Atlantic Highlands (est. June 1897), Lakewood, and Sea Bright. Letson also operated on his own but as far is known, DeHart only worked in partnership with Letson.

In the 1890s, DeHart and Letson advertised a wide variety of types of photographs and mounting styles: platinotypes (1893); Aureole and Mintha mounts, plus printing services for amateurs (1894); life size and combination portraits (1896); Mantillo Petites, $1.25 per dozen, and Regular Petites (“a trifle smaller”), $1.00 per dozen, $.25 extra for Carbonette finish (1897); Cabinet Carbonettes, $5 per dozen (1897); Imperials, $2.50 or $3.00 per dozen (1898); Petite Cards, $1.35 per dozen, and Miniature Carbonettes, $1 per dozen (1899).

The dangers of photographic processing in this period are illustrated by a newspaper article dated July 17, 1901, which stated that Letson “was sweeping out his gallery at Atlantic Highlands a few days ago when he raised a blister on his hand. The blister opened and Mr. Letson got some photographic chemicals in the sore. Blood poisoning set in and Mr. Letson had a very painful hand, though he was not rendered unable to attend to business.”
137. Woman with bonnet and her son with hat, ca. 1870. Carte-de-visite, app. 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: Colwell Lane, Landscape and Portrait Photographer, Red Bank. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.

Colwell (a.k.a. Colville) Lane, born in New Jersey about 1843, was a photographer in Red Bank by 1867, when he paid the $10 annual tax for photography businesses to the Internal Revenue Service. In the 1870 census, he is listed as a white male, 27, living in Shrewsbury Township with his wife Emily, 19, also born in New Jersey, and their infant daughter Nina. Lane reported a net personal worth of $500 that year.

In the early 1870s, Lane founded and became President of the New Jersey Stereoscopic View Company, based in Red Bank with a branch in Philadelphia. From 1872 to 1876, it published more than one hundred stereographic views of Monmouth County, as well as a few of South America. David Carvalho, Manager of the Company, was the son of Solomon Carvalho of Baltimore, a painter and pioneer daguerreotypist believed to be the first Jewish photographer in the United States. David and his father traveled to South America, so it is likely that the Carvalhos were responsible for the Company’s South American views. Lane later was in business at 145 Eighth Avenue, New York City, 1888-1890.

138. “Jennie Miller,” in posing chair, ca. 1870. Carte-de-visite, approximately 4 ½ x 2 ¼ inches. Photographer: Ferris C. Lockwood, Artistic Photographer, Freehold. Gary D. Saretzky Collection.

Ferris C. Lockwood was an active professional photographer in Freehold from the late 1860s to the 1880s, making both albumen paper prints and tintypes from glass negatives. He produced portraits, as seen here, as well as stereographs of Freehold and the vicinity, possibly as late as the 1880s. In 1872, Lockwood published a pamphlet, “For Parlor or Pocket. The Photograph Album. All About Photography” (copy at Monmouth County Historical Association), which states that at the Monmouth County Fair he received a “premium for work in the Highest Department of Photography.” The Monmouth Inquirer (1873), reporting the great fire in Freehold, stated, “Lockwood, the Photographer, obtained several fine pictures of the fire from different points, and is doing a good business selling copies for 25 cts. each. Many are purchasing copies to send to their friends.”
Rutgers Special Collections in New Brunswick holds examples of Lockwood stereos of the interiors of Tennent Church and the First Presbyterian Church, Freehold, ca. 1880. A stereo by Lockwood of colonial relics is reproduced in Monmouth County in the Centennial Era: A Pictorial Review (1976), identifying the photographer as a nephew of Superintendent of Schools Samuel Lockwood, who might have been the Samuel Lockwood who was a photographer in Keyport, 1865-1866.

In the 1880 census, Lockwood was listed as 31 years old, born in New York to a father born in England and a mother born in New York, living with his wife Emma (28), born in Long Island to New York-born parents, and their two-year-old daughter, Bessie.
139. “J.O. Buckelew,” boy standing with wicker chair and painted backdrop, ca. 1895. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ¼ inches. Photographer: Arthur L. Hall, Photographer, 22 W. Main Street, Freehold. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association, P007.

The boy in the picture is John Otis Buckelew (1883-1973). Arthur Hall was active as a professional photographer in Freehold from the mid-1890s to 1922. The 1900 Census described him as a photographer, 28, single, born in New York and boarding at the home of Louis Prince on Manalapan Ave., Freehold. He was still single in 1920 according to the census that year. His last known residence was at 26 Hudson Street in Freehold in 1922.

140. “Frank Cottrell,” ca. 1894. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ½ inches. Photographer: John L. Scott, Freehold. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association, P835.
The Knights of Pythias is a fraternal organization chartered by Congress in 1864 to promote peace and healing the divisions of North and South caused by the Civil War. In this portrait, Frank Cottrell poses in his Knights of Pythias uniform. Behind the Pythagorean’s feet can be seen the base of an immobilizer which has a bracket attached to hold his head steady. Cottrell, born about 1854 (too young to have served in the Civil War), was a photographer; he had a studio at 44 South Street in Freehold in the 1870s. According to the 1880 census, he was married and had three children.

John L. Scott, who made the portrait, was active as a photographer in Freehold from 1892 to 1898, with a studio on Throckmorton Street not far from the county government headquarters at the Hall of Records, which at the time also housed the courtrooms and jail. In 1892, he photographed convicted murderer Louis Harriott shortly before his execution for the murder of Annie Leonard. Harriott gave copies of his carte-de-visite portrait to visitors to his cell, one of which is now at the Monmouth County Historical Association.

141. [Front and back of photograph.] Van Brackel Sisters, 1880s. Cabinet card, 6 ½ x 4 ½ inches. Photographer: Ferdinand W. Maag, Keyport. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Ferdinand Maag, born in New York in 1865 to German immigrant parents, was active as a photographer in Keyport from no later than 1886 to 1927. The design on the back of Maag’s card photograph is quite typical of studio photographers in the 1880s. Maag describes his business as “Art Photography,” to suggest that his work is of high quality. His statement, “Instantaneous process used exclusively,” is a reference to gelatin dry plate negatives, a technological improvement to collodion wet plate negatives that were popular until about 1880. Maag also includes his address, “Front Street, 3 doors above Post Office,” to direct future customers who see examples of his work.

142. See #141.

143. Husband and wife, ca. 1865. Carte-de-visites, each 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: John Roth, Freehold. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
The earliest established photographer in Freehold was John Roth, whose daguerreotype studio shared space with his jewelry shop, where he sold and repaired watches. Roth was born in Germany about 1821 and emigrated in 1848. He opened his daguerrean rooms in 1853 and expanded his practice to ambrotypes and paper photographs by the end of the decade. After 1872, he seems to have given up professional photography and listed his profession as watchmaker. Roth’s obituary was published in the Philadelphia Photographer in 1874, but the report seems to have been premature: he is listed in the 1875 and 1880 censuses along with his wife and children.
Saretzky, Gary D. “Nineteenth-Century New Jersey Photographers,” New Jersey History, Fall/Winter 2004 (122:3-4), 110.

144. Young man with glasses and mustache, early 1870s. Carte-de-visite, 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: Griffin & Scholl, Freehold. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
E. Scholl is listed as a photographer in the Monmouth County Directory in 1875, but not Griffin, suggesting that their partnership had ended by that time.

145. Fifteen men with a large pot (steaming clams?), September 13, 1914. Image approximately 7×9 inches, mounted. Photographer: Andrew Coleman. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Born in Red Bank on December 5, 1858, Coleman worked in his father’s jewelry business until 1888, when he became interested in photography. He opened his own studio in 1892, moving to several downtown locations over the next twenty years. In 1912, he established his business at the Red Bank Register building and became staff photographer for the newspaper.

146. Young woman resting elbow on log made into a fence. Tintype, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches with paper mat. Photographer: Meeson’s Pleasure Bay Studio, Long Branch, ca. 1900.
Although Charles R. Meeson has not been documented in Long Branch until a 1902 city directory listed him at 187 Broadway, this tintype may be from a few years earlier. The photographer is probably the Charles Meeson who, at the age of three in 1880, emigrated with his parents from England and in 1920 was living in Orange, Essex County, according to the U.S. Census.
During the Victorian era, a number of tintypists operated at the Jersey Shore in the summer season, long after the tintype process, introduced in the 1850s, had lost popularity inland. Even today, having an old fashioned photograph made is still popular at the Shore, although the photographers generally use costumes, rather than an antique process, to achieve a nostalgic experience.
The flimsy paper mats used to present the tintypes sometimes were rubber stamped on the back with the photographer’s name and address, as in this example. Since most of these mats are now lost, it is difficult today to find tintypes with photographer identifications.

147. Woman standing in front of painted backdrop with beach scene, ca. 1900. Tintype, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches with paper mat. Photographer: Isaac Van Tine, Long Branch. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Painted backdrops were used extensively by photographers to suggest place, beginning in the daguerrean era around 1850, and backdrops depicting the ocean are often found in Jersey Shore tintypes. The photographer, Isaac Van Tine, was born in January 1862 in New Jersey and spent his youth in the Trenton area, where his brothers Henry and Peter [Vantine] were also photographers. Isaac had several locations in Long Branch between 1896 and 1902. This tintype is from the one at Cranmer’s Beach, corner Ocean and Chelsea avenues.

148. Two tintypes, one of a man one a woman, from the Jersey Shore, ca. 1900, with painted backdrops depicting sailboats on the water, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches. Photographer: unknown. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
Although there is no photographer information regarding these tintypes, they may have come from the same studio and are typical examples of the genre. Although very inexpensive, tintypes are among the most durable of photographic processes. They got their nickname because tin was cheap; actually, they are made on iron plates and their more proper name is ferrotype. In the original process, the photographer poured sensitized collodion over the plate, which was purchased already painted with Japan black. In these examples, the edges of the plate were covered by the plateholder during exposure, so they remained black.

149. See #148.

150. Tintype of standing woman with fancy hat in front of painted backdrop, ca. 1900, with painted backdrop depicting forest and mountains, approximately 4 ¼ x 2 ½ inches.. Photographer: Edward Lippencott, Asbury Park. Collection: Gary D. Saretzky.
As is the case with a number of photographers who operated in Monmouth County in this period, no definite information has been found about Lippencott. The paper mat provided the identification.

151. Oval mounted albumen print of game of croquet, including George and Josephine Hoey, and four other children, ca. 1870. Photographer: Gustavus Pach, Long Branch. Collection: Monmouth County Historical Association.
The photographer of this charming view of a by-gone age became the most prolific 19th century photographer in Monmouth County. A native of Berlin, Gustavus V. Pach (1845 – 1904), was one of five brothers who in some way engaged in photography. An older brother, Morris, was Gustavus’s first partner in the 1860s and 1870s. The Pachs began photographing in Long Branch from a mobile wagon in 1866 and opened a studio the following year. They are highly regarded for their stereo views, some also issued in other formats, as well as for thousands of fine portraits. Among their subjects were prominent summer residents of Long Branch, including George Jay Gould, Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, and Mark Twain; they also photographed the houses and families of the rich and famous. As their business grew, the Pachs hired cameramen to make some of the photos that carried the Pach imprint.
In 1870, subsequent to the establishment of their Long Branch studio, Pach Brothers opened another in New York City, which beginning in 1903 was under the direction of the youngest brother, Gotthelf (born 1851 – died 1925). The New York studio went out of family ownership in 1966 but continued operations as Pach Brothers until the 1990s. Pach was thus one of the longest-lasting photography businesses in the United States, along with Bachrach’s and Sarony’s, both of which are still in existence but which were not active in nineteenth-century New Jersey.
In addition to New York and Long Branch, Pach Brothers managed studios in Ocean County, Dover Township (1864), Jones River (1865), and Toms River (1864-65, 1874-75), as well as in Poughkeepsie, New York (1879-80). One of their specialties was college portraits, such as those of Princeton University classes they took for many years beginning in 1879; they operated in other college towns as well. By 1888, they were conducting business in Long Branch, Ocean Grove, and Princeton, New Jersey; New Haven and Middletown, Connecticut; Cambridge, Amherst, Wellesley, and Williamstown, Massachusetts; New York City and West Point (where through the influence of President Grant, they photographed the classes for more than thirty years); Hanover, New Hampshire; and Easton, Pennsylvania.
In 1896, Gustavus Pach opened another Ocean County studio in Lakewood, New Jersey. After his death in 1904, the Lakewood firm was run by his wife and children living at the studio/residence, with George A. M. Morris, another German immigrant, as chief photographer. (A branch continued on Brighton Avenue in Long Branch.) George Morris (born 1879 – died 1948) began working for Gustavus in 1898 and eventually took over the New Jersey Pach Brothers business, retaining the Pach name until about 1918. George H. Moss, Jr., who with Karen Schnitzspahn wrote the authoritative book about the Pachs, Those Innocent Years, acquired a large collection of Pach’s glass-plate negatives from George Morris’s son; this collection, along with a smaller one donated by Schnitzspahn, is being preserved by the Monmouth County Historical Association.
Saretzky, Gary D. “Nineteenth-Century New Jersey Photographers,” New Jersey History, Fall/Winter 2004 (122:3-4), 111-112.

Photographs by an Amateur, Oscar Hennings

These prints were made from scans of 4×5 inch glass plate negatives, probably taken by a young man named Oscar Hennings between 1899 and 1912. Little is known about Hennings except that he lived in Jersey City and is listed in city directories as a clerk. (Other family members, most of whom were born in Germany, or had German-born parents, lived at the same addresses.) Hennings kept a log of his photographs that describe 183 numbered plates (some missing) in the collection, which is on loan to the Monmouth County Archives by a private collector. The log indicates that Hennings took a number of views in Monmouth County, including in Asbury Park, Highland Beach, and Long Branch. He did not record the places for all of his photographs but others were taken in Jersey City, the New York City harbor area, Lake Hopatcong, the Catskills, eastern Pennsylvania, and elsewhere in the region. In all likelihood, Hennings traveled to these places on weekends or on holidays and recorded people and places in which he was interested. He was careful to record for each photograph his exposure time and f-stop (lens opening); in later years, he also wrote down the month, time of day, and the light quality (hazy, bright, etc.). The photographs by Hennings are presented here as those of an enthusiastic amateur at the turn of the century who, like many others, visited Monmouth County for recreational purposes. Titles are taken from Hennings’ log.

152. “Mama Sifting the Ashes.” Oscar’s mother goes through the ashes to find “clinkers,” bits of coal that have not burned. [Hennings, #17]

153. “A Card Party.” “Mama” is in the center. The man on the left of the photo is probably Oscar’s father. [Hennings, #50]

154. “Mabel and Edna Laughing.” Perhaps the girls are laughing because they are being photographed wearing identical clothing. [Hennings, #35]

155. [Two photographs.] “Casting Pigs at Wharton Blast Furnace” and “Clearing Out Slag from Ladles,” circa 1908. The Port Oram Iron Company built the Port Oram Blast Furnace (later known as the Wharton Furnace) in 1868. It was located in Wharton, Morris County, near the Morris Canal and operated until 1925. [Hennings, #122, 123]

156. See #155.

157. “The Beach at Long Branch.” In Hennings’ log book, the immediately preceding image was “The Iron Pier at Long Branch,” which unfortunately is missing from the collection. In all likelihood, this image was taken from the Pier, looking north. [Hennings, #55]

158. “Sound Steamer ‘Priscilla’ of the Fall River Line.” At 440 feet long, the Priscilla was one of the largest and most lavishly appointed ships built to take Boston-bound passengers from New York to Fall River, Massachusetts, where they took a train. The Priscilla would leave in the evening and passengers would arrive in Boston before 9am the next day. Also known as the “Queen of Long Island Sound” and the “Mauretania of Inland Waters,” the Priscilla was built in Chester, PA, in 1894 and was scrapped in the 1930s. Its 130-foot-long main saloon was “decorated in northern Italian Renaissance style, while her dining room boasted Indo-Moorish motifs.” [Hennings, #45] Ships of the World: An Historical Encyclopedia (web version)

159. Untitled, possibly “The ‘Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse’ in Midstream.” The light area on the right of this image is the result of paper stuck to the glass plate as a result of a water-related incident at some time in the past. [Hennings, negative B]

160. “Surf Life at Asbury Park.” Note the bathing costumes popular in the early 1900s. [Hennings, #56]

161. “Shaving Under Circumstances.” This photograph was made on a September morning at 11am, probably in 1911. The exposure was 1/5 of a second. Hennings immediately took another picture of a group on the Lake Champlain steamer, “Ticonderoga,” so undoubtedly the shaving picture was made on board ship. [Hennings, #152]

162. “The ‘Helping Hand.’” This group of women, photographed in about 1907, probably belonged to a social service agency. Hennings probably made this portrait near Lake Hopatcong. [Hennings, #114]

163. “Front Part of Shop with Vise Bench.” The calendar on the wall is for December 1899 and this is one of the lower-numbered glass plates in the collection. The previous plate in the series, now missing, was of downtown buildings from the roof of the shop, making it likely that these views were made in Jersey City where Hennings lived. [Hennings #24]